Road to VR is Giving Away Google Glass Explorer Invites (U.S. Only)

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Interested in joining the Google Glass Explorer program? We’ve got some invites to hand out so that you can get some Glass of your own.

Glass is Google’s prototype unobtrusive head mounted display which has been released in limited quantities through what they call the ‘Explorer’ program. If you’d like to buy Glass for yourself and join the Explorers, you’ll nee an invite. Luckily, we have three to give away, and it couldn’t be easier to get one.

Before we tell you how, please read the following requirements below and don’t enter if you don’t meet them (lest you take an invite from someone who might actually use it). To make use of the invite you must:

  • Be a US resident
  • Be at least 18 years old
  • Provide a US shipping address or pick up your Glass at one of Google’s locations in New York, San Francisco or Los Angeles
  • Pay $1500 for Google Glass

To enter, leave a comment on this article answering the question “What interests you most about Glass?” The winners will be chosen randomly from valid entries and you’ll be notified at the email address associated with your Road to VR account. Winners will be drawn on the 21st of December.

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Comments

  1. Felix says

    What interests me most about Google Glass is the ability to create my own apps that fluidly combines the real world with the virtual world. Would love to play with Google glass and combine features like facial recognition and pull up a card about the person to whom your speaking to. Sort of like your own personal reminder or butler who reminds you who the “stranger! your talking to is.

  2. Owen says

    What interests me most about glass, and wearable computing in general is the concept of extending our natural mental faculties. Where our memory fails or our knowledge is insufficient, a glass app could potentially fill in the blanks.
    I want to experiment with contextual information, automatically finding data relevant to my activities and presenting it unobtrusively, or making quick notes of my surroundings so I can refer back to them easily. Ultimately I never want to say to myself “I’ll have to remember to look that up later.”

  3. Adam Kiefer says

    I would like to design applications for general health screening and post-injury symptom prevention in children. Specifically, immediately following a concussion there are visual deficits that are present and easily picked up by google glass technology that can be integrated into an app for side-line assessments of young athletes. I also want to develop applications to improve physical therapist/patient interactions by providing real-time feedback of clinical assessments to the clinician combined with real-time feedback to the child patient as they progress through exercises and work to return to normal activities. The end goal is to broaden the scope of these projects to help adults and the elderly as well.

  4. Alex says

    What interests me most about glass is its potential as a hands free user interface for physicians to use during surgery. A wealth of information could be at their … Eyeball tips?

  5. McKenzie Bryan-Kjaer says

    Google glass interests me because it will provide me with a screen on which any kind of information can be displayed at any time… I won’t have to check a watch or my phone… it’s just there. It could either be very intrusive to social interactions, or could be much more seamless than checking our phones for information. During a conversation and you wonder about some factual question like ‘who was the 10th president of the US?’ or ‘is it supposed to rain tomorrow?’ and the answer can pop up into the corner of your screen automatically. Don’t need to stop to check your phone or a computer. It’s the future!

  6. chris says

    Google Glass interests me in it’s ability to innovate in the gaming space. My Oculus Rift is amazing and VR has come very far in recent years, however, VR is a very solitary experience. With VR I’m replacing most of my senses with completely artificial environments. With AR and Google Glass I’ll be overlaying a game experience on top of real life. This enables more social-ability and a drop in / drop out aspect that is currently difficult with the Rift. It will be interesting to see the comparison and the direction both with progress in the coming years. There is certainly room for both. Thank you for the opportunity to enter this drawing.

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