TechCrunch’s Josh Constine sat down with Oculus co-founder and VP of Product Nate Mitchell today at this year’s TechCrunch Disrupt to talk more about the consumer version of the Oculus Rift, hot on the heels of today’s surprise release date announcement.

In the 20 minute interview—found on TechCrunch’s website— Mitchell was cagey on the subject of pricing, VR input solutions, and any and all technical specs of the upcoming consumer version of the Oculus Rift, now simply called “the Rift” in the official Oculus shipping announcement blog post.

See Also: Oculus Announce Consumer ‘Oculus Rift’ Release Date as Q1 2016 (Update: Confirmed)

In response to the price of the Rift, a point that interviewer Josh Constine drove home three separate times, Mitchell had this to say:

“One of the important things has always been to make it affordable. We want to reach a state where we have hundreds of millions if not billions of people in VR, and so nailing that affordability is really at the heart of the product that we’re trying to build. We do see VR ultimately as a mass market product and we want to get  it there.”

Mitchell goes on to underline that users will require a “nice gaming rig…[and not]… a crazy high-end gaming computer, but something that would run modern games well today.” Although indefinite, Oculus will hopefully release exact technical specs before the pre-orders start in late 2015.

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When asked about Oculus’ input devices, Mitchell said that more information about VR peripherals would be revealed in the coming months as the company ramps up for E3.


Road to VR will be on the ground at this year’s E3, taking place June 16-18th, to cover all Oculus-related news.

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  • Don Gateley

    Someone needs to address content channels. Will it remain open or will users be restricted to what they deem “appropriate” (read profitable) content via their proprietary channels?