Popular city-builder Cities: Skylines (2015) doesn’t offer native VR support, however the franchise is getting its first official made-for-VR game soon called Cities: VR, which will let you go hands-on as you take the reigns of your city from a new perspective. First unveiled back in December, now developers Fast Travel Games say the Quest 2 native is slated to arrive April 28th.

Update (March 31st, 2022): Cities: VR is coming to Quest 2 (re: not original Quest) on April 28th. The studio is offering a 10% discount on pre-orders, which you can find over at the Quest Store starting today.

Fast Travel Games also tossed out a new gameplay walkthrough video, linked below. In it programmer Martin Larsson says the team has been creating the “definitive city-building experience of City: Skylines [in] VR.”

The video gives you a good overview of the basics behind the series, which explains the game’s various city management tools, ways to expand, gain citizens, and build a unique city. Check out the new walkthrough video below:

Original Article (December 2nd, 2021): Cities: VR is being developed and published by veteran VR studio Fast Travel Games, the Stockholm-based team behind Apex Construct, The Curious Tale of the Stolen Pets, and Wraith: The Oblivion – Afterlife.

The city-building and management simulator is coming to Meta Quest 2 in Spring of 2022. It’s uncertain whether Cities: VR will be exclusive to Quest 2, however if any of the studio’s other titles are any indication it’s possible we may see a timed release on other major VR platforms.

Just like the original Cities: Skylinesyou’ll be able to do all of the same urban-planning and city management, albeit with the ability to fully immerse yourself in the world by either towering over your city or zooming down to see the day-to-day action.

You can get a better look at gameplay in the video below, which shows that Cities: VR appears essentially City: Skylines translated directly into VR.

Cities: Skylines is the ultimate modern city-builder, and it’s an honor to bring this franchise to VR,” said Erik Odeldahl, Creative Director at Fast Travel Games. “The city-building genre has huge potential in the VR market and we couldn’t wait to work on this IP. We’ve spent a ton of time, research, and energy to translate Cities: Skylines to VR in a way that is both approachable for new players and a new challenge for Cities veterans. We can’t wait to see what players build!”

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Fast Travel Games says they’ll be talking more about Cities: VR closer to launch on Quest 2 (re: not the original Quest), so we hope to learn more about other platforms and whether the VR title will support any mods or additional paid DLC such as different buildings, environments, or gameplay features.

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  • g-man

    Great idea but I’d prefer it not to have dumbed-down graphics.

    • Raphael

      The VR graphics shown in the alpha gameplay video look fine.

      • CMoney

        I agree, and vanilla C:S isn’t an exceptionally good-looking game anyway. It might be more challenging to display nighttime scenes and high overhead views (both conspicuously absent from this video), but if the rest of the game is good, then that’s not a big deal.

      • Stefan

        We don’t know whether this is actual Quest2 footage, though. It might very well be running on a PC.

    • Anonymous

      Part of the reason the original game is very CPU/GPU intensive is because it is all real time calculation and every element is rendered together.
      In a VR setting if they can optimize it such as only rendering what you can humanly see, the hurdle should go down significantly.

      I however personally don’t see a Quest exclusive version going anywhere tho, as part of the fun of city building should be mods and user assets.

      • g-man

        The PC version only renders what you can see too, and only in mono. Agreed about mods though.

      • Raphael

        The game should be able to support the new application spacewarp to significantly reduce overhead.

      • david vincent

        What you’re describing is called “occlusion culling” and is used on every 3D gaming platform since always, you know.

    • Ad

      CPU too, this genre is really performance intensive and having a set frame rate you have to meet sounds nothing ideal. Doubly so with mobile hardware and VR controls.

      • Nepenthe

        Should be fine, just make your cities small and unimpressive, problem solved.

  • Lhorkan

    Really impressed with what they’re achieving on Quest 2 here!

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  • Jonathan Winters III

    Wow, that’s a huge franchise – Quest is going from strength to strength!

  • Ad

    A mobile phone is clearly the best platform for a high level city builder game.

    • NWO

      I think so too. Especially when that mobile phone userbase vastly
      outnumber those of other VR platforms. Always nice to see the PC crowd
      leaving fanboyism aside to a more moderate view of things.

    • Hans

      Absolutely. If you want to simulate the world – which is cast and three dimensional – by far the most natural way to do it is to put it on a tiny two dimensional screen. That really feels real, haha.

  • Looks nice for fans of genre!

  • Gabriel Cash

    When they say you can view it from the streets and follow citizens around, does that mean walk around your city and view it from the perspective of one of its citizens, or is it just a closer God view?