Recently emerging out stealth, Singapore based Deca has revealed an ambitious PC VR headset called DecaGear. With built-in face and hip-tracking, the company says the headset is designed to embrace social VR content, but also promises very high resolution displays, inside-out tracking, and even wireless game streaming from your PC with an add-on accessory. At just $450 and a promised release date of May 2021, consider us skeptical until we see more evidence that the company can deliver on its ambitions.

DecaGear emerged this month seemingly out of thin air and has not shied away from making big promises.

The venture, purportedly based in Singapore, is headed by CEO Or Kuntzman who, according to his LinkedIn profile, has co-founded two companies between 2004 and 2013, and was most recently the Managing Director at a now-defunct studio called Betastamp, which described itself as a sort of startup-idea incubator.

According to the profile, Kuntzman’s latest work is founding Megadodo Simulation Games which “produces and operates D.E.C.A, a free-to-play massive multiplayer virtual reality gaming platform,” though I haven’t been able to find any external evidence of the MMO’s existence. Alongside ambitions of a VR MMO, the company apparently has also pivoted into full blown development of its own VR headset called DecaGear.

The DecaGear headset is claimed to have a 2,160 × 2,160 (4.6MP) per-eye resolution at 90Hz (which would match the class-leading Reverb G2), IPD adjustment, face-tracking with two inward-facing cameras, motion controllers with finger-tracking, four camera inside-out tracking, and full support for SteamVR content. All supposedly for just $450. The company says the face-tracking feature would be ideally suited for social VR content like VRChat, and presumably also the company’s own D.E.C.A VR MMO.

SEE ALSO
DecaGear CEO Shares Details on Company Background, Future Plans

While Megadodo is making big promises and doesn’t seem to have much concrete history to point to, at least the details of the DecaGear headset seem thoroughly considered and the company has even offer up some good ideas, like the DecaMove hip-tracking attachment.

Image courtesy Megadodo Simulation Games

The puck-like device is designed to clip onto your belt so that VR apps can understand your hip-direction in order to provide a locomotion heading that’s independent from your head or hands. Implemented correctly, that really could make thumbstick-based locomotion in VR more intuitive and make avatar movements look a bit more natural.

Image courtesy Megadodo Simulation Games

The company has released two videos, one which shows its face-tracking in action and the other which shows hip-based locomotion.

Megadodo is also promising DecaAir, an add-on accessory that allows users to stream VR games wirelessly from their PC to the headset for a mere $50. Once again we remain skeptical considering major PC headset makers have either opted to avoid wireless streaming due to latency and quality issues, or have released expensive hardware to make it possible, like the $350 Vive Wireless Adapter.

Image courtesy Megadodo Simulation Games

Between the too-good-to-be-true prices, the fact that the company is taking pre-orders right out of the gate, and with no track record of hardware development, it feels way too early to say whether or not Megadodo is really capable of delivering everything it claims. We’ve reached out to the company to learn more about its headset and how it expects to achieve its ambitious vision.


Thanks to Adil3tr for the tip!

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  • TechPassion

    Good. What is the FOV ? Probably like G2?

    • Or Kuntzman

      114 degree

      • TechPassion

        It would be not bad then.

  • I believe it when I see it. Its almost to good to be true. But very promissing though…

    • Andrew Jakobs

      But then again, May 2021 is still a long way off..

      • Conor Madigan

        Unfortunately that is not a very long time at all in development and production terms. They would need to be very close to having a finalized hardware and Soft ware design already. Sourcing components and PCBs needs to start in December for first factory ramp up batches. If not Chinese New Year shut downs in China which hampers supplies worldwide every year will impact them. First production lots are used to iron out creases in the production tools, design for manufacturing and production flow at the factory. If these are delayed the product will be delayed or very very poor quality and expensive to make.
        This being their first HW product, I will bet that ramping up production will be a mess. I am extremely skeptical of the timeline and hence CEO.

  • You don’t need a device to do wireless PC-VR on the Quest, just a copy of Bigscreen.

    Is there something this puck is doing that software on a PC couldn’t do just as well?

    • Sam

      Bigscreen -> Virtual Desktop

    • Ad

      If the headset is native PC, then it would work better than the Quest on PC, and we’ll see if it’s as good as virtual desktop. This is better if there isn’t extra extra latency.

    • Zerofool

      The puck is just for measuring the angle between your head and waist.
      Initially I thought the $50 wireless add-on is a WiFi 5/6 radio with the antenna, a video decoder that generates HDMI/DP signal for the HMD and probably a battery (similar to the Vive Wireless Adapter). But on their website, it is stated that it’s just a 7000mAh battery pack. In that case, the WiFi radio, antenna and decoder must be integrated in the HMD.

      • Andrew Jakobs

        So if that’s the case, then you should be able to use any battery pack, you can get a lot bigger batterypacks for a lot less.

  • TechPassion

    Smoothly adjustable IPD is a must.

  • Ad

    I would guess a 90% chance this is not legit.

    • SacredScroll260

      i’d give it some time. If this turns out to be legit and has everything it claimed to have, it would be massive for the company, which in turn lets them create more headsets with higher quality.

  • ViRGiN

    You’re doing disservice by covering stuff like that. Vaporware.

    • gothicvillas

      Are you sure or you are guessing?

      • ViRGiN

        Logic. Can i make a website promising twice as much for $50 cheaper, starts selling reserve slots for $10 and enjoy the entire vr communities gets hyped again?
        Someone desperate was searching vr on YouTube by upload date and stumbled upon this. Is this the new marketing tactic?

        This headset has no reason to cost so little. If true, they would easily sell it for a bit more.

        But okay, if you want and get excited, go ahead. Roadtovr is thirsty for anything, first “great news” from pimax, now this… Yet they didn’t want to cover the scam of cv1 audio kit from Palmer Luckey. Screw such clickbaity joirnalism.

        • GunnyNinja

          Can you also put out videos with a prototype?

          • ViRGiN

            It doesn’t take much to 3d print and polish it so it’s not immediately obvious, and then fake all gameplay, just like latest omni Kickstarter.

          • GunnyNinja

            Well yeah it would, but maybe watch the videos and see if it looks 3D printed. I’m not in line to buy one yet, but it’s looking better than vaporware.

          • ViRGiN

            I said i could make 3d prototype, this obviously wasn’t it but then even kickstarters have one somewhat okay looking for presentation.

          • GunnyNinja

            I have a 3D printer. I wouldn’t have bothered making that claim. Better than having to walk it back later.

          • ViRGiN

            But in any case it should be the company doing the hard work to convince us, not clickbaity media outlets like this one just talking about “all the possibilities”. They have done literally zero to earn anyone trust, they just uploaded video and someone found it and spread the word. Surprised this isn’t a Kickstarter, or maybe it will be? Kickstarter is the best way to earn money with zero responsibility.

          • GunnyNinja

            What’s clickbaity about this article? How do you think companies convince people to buy their products? The media. Youtubers. Just another form of advertising. I think you are complaining a bit too soon. And I implied nothing about this being the first 2K headset. I said it wasn’t mainstream yet.

    • James Cobalt

      I think they did a pretty responsible job in how they covered it.

  • Ryan

    Ok, also skeptical but:
    They seem to know what PCVR gamers are looking for
    They have real injection molded prototype hardware
    The controllers look good
    They have very professional renders
    Taiwan has some serious tech chops, AFIAK the only country making 5nm chips
    This is no 3DHEAD.

    • Gonzax

      Agreed! Just look at the controllers, they took the best parts of Touch + the best of the knuckles, they really seem to know what they’re doing. They certainly got my attention.

    • Nicholas

      Pimax also knew what many players wanted. Higher resolution and fov. Can’y say they have really delivered on their promises.
      For now I call this headset the Megadud.

  • wheeler

    I am skeptical about the company but definitely looking forward to impressions.

    But even if it is real, I’m also skeptical about the execution. Specs are one thing but execution is what it all comes down to. E.g. are the lenses good? (do they suffer from bad geometric stability, poor edge to edge clarity, god rays, etc etc) Does the wireless have latency? Is the tracking inaccurate or unreliable? Are the ergonomics any good? And so on. If it fails at any one of those it can ruin the headset–all of these problems are very difficult to solve so it’s hard to imagine an independent company has addressed all of them to a sufficient level (unless someone else is helping them out).

    Still, I am excited. The waist tracking (for waist relative locomotion) is something I’ve been interested in for a long time.

  • Rupert Jung

    No halo strap design, no audio. Pass :)

    • Gonzax

      I hate halo strap, that’s the last thing I want. Audio is a must, though.

      • Rupert Jung

        You really prefer a ski goggle design, pressing against your face? I’m really tired of it. PSVR is – together with the (Lenovo-designed) Oculus Rift S are by far the most comfortable headsets today (IHMO).

        • Gonzax

          Yes I do, I absolutely hated the PSVR’s strap, it’s bulky, ugly and not particularly comfortable for me. I prefer the Index’s strap, by far, or CV1’s, even Quest2’s default strap is better for me.
          Just a matter of preference, though, everyone’s different and it also depends on everyone’s head shape.

  • Lulu Vi Britannia

    I honestly don’t get all that skepticism.
    When Pimax was released, it was shady because it was promising impossible specs at the time and lying straight out of the box (“8K” for 2 4K screens, ffs…). And yet people were genuinely hyped about it.
    But the DecaGear offers specs that we already have. Inside-out tracking? It exists. 2K per eye? It exists.

    Face tracking is new, but they explained how it works and it’s coherent.
    As for hip tracking, it’s literally just a marker for the software. Nothing impossible.

    Yes, the company comes out of thin air… but so did Oculus VR.

    Of course, it’s all about the execution, so we obviously need reviews. But for now, there’s absolutely no reason to be skeptical about it. It’s a competitive tech at a competitice price, what every other VR headset should have been.

    My only issue is their body tracking system. Face tracking and finger tracking is nice, but we really need a bit more than hip tracking (which only gives the software a direction anyway). We need legs, at least.

    • CampofMusic Gaming

      “Yes, the company comes out of thin air… but so did Oculus VR.”
      nah, Oculus VR started as a kickstarter.

      the issue here is.. this hardware?? is expensive to make, you lose so much money and dont get them back, so to sell it for 450 is hard to be true, they dont have any digital store to try and give them back the money, they basically telling you go play the steam VR games, when people say this is hard to be true they are not joking.

    • GunnyNinja

      These things exist but aren’t mainstream, are they? Why isn’t everyone making a headset with these basic specs? Why isn’t every company making complete systems for under $500? If it was so simple wouldn’t everyone be doing it already? That’s why there is skepticism.

      • Lulu Vi Britannia

        Because no one in the current market is interested in making VR mainstream except Facebook (who, by the way, released a 300$ headset with specs of that caliber). It’s better for them to release their products at a premium price and justify by saying “it’s new, that’s why it’s expensive” (when in reality they’re just making a big-ass margin). It’s that simple. Again: it’s just releasing a competitive product at a competitive price, there’s nothing wrong with that and Facbeook literally just did that with the Quest 2.

        Now, being skeptical about the company itself, sure, I understand (they’re literally coming from nowhere, lol). But the headset, as it is presented here, is absolutely nothing alarming.

        • James Cobalt

          Facebook released their $300 headset at or below cost. Between R&D, production, component cost, distribution, marketing, et al they are losing serious money on the hardware side. They make money back in the form of sales by controlling the extremely profitable software ecosystem – but more so they are willing to lose money now to be the market leader later when XR is as big an industry as smart phones.

          This company doesn’t have the scale, experience, bargaining power, or software revenue that Facebook has – hence the skepticism about the validity and viability of this product.

  • Loremipsum

    What’s so “too good to be true” here? 2160×2160 panels are fairy standard now and face tracking machine vision cameras cost few dollars and would only be useful to few niche games with custom plugins. 450 USD vs HP’s 600 USD isn’t a huge difference either. HP has the brand, this noname has the lower cost.

    • Adam Broadhurst

      Are you trying to be contrary for the sake of it?
      216×2160 panels are fairly standard are they? What percentage of VR headsets have those panels i wonder?
      Wireless,how many headsets have wireless capability?
      How many have eye tracking,how many have face tracking and finger tracking?
      And how many VR headsets have a less than $450 rrp?

      I really struggle to understand your motivation to write such rubbish.

      • Lulu Vi Britannia

        2K per eye is the current state of the art for VR. Every headset being released currently have it.
        Wireless literally takes nothing. The Quest 2 has it for free. All you need is wifi to emulate a wired connection.
        Finger tracking, Valve did it, they just had to copy it.
        Face tracking is their only innovation and they explained how it works.

        As for the price, this is what every VR headset should cost.

        I wont say theres nothing shady about it, but its really not THAT shady. Much more trustworthy than Pimax.

        • GunnyNinja

          “Every headset being released currently have it.” You mean that one?

          • Zerofool

            A few examples in that ballpark:
            HP Reverb (2019)
            Pico Neo 2
            HP Reverb G2

            Even the Quest 2 comes close, although not quite (has 15-25% less pixels, depending on what you’re comparing it to).

          • kraeuterbutter

            quest 2 has only single display— completley other thing

          • Zerofool

            How so? The argument here is that there are other HMDs out there that provide 2Kx2K per eye. It doesn’t matter if they use a single or separate displays behind the lenses. The Pico Neo 2 also uses a single 4K display. That doesn’t change the fact that in the end you get 2Kx2K per eye (1920×2160 to be precise).

          • GunnyNinja

            Don’t count the Reverbs separately. Just an upgrade to an existing design. The Pico is not a consumer headset. So much for making it sound like a lot.

          • Zerofool

            We are counting the releases of HMDs that have 2k per eye. These are two separate releases. What I’m saying is that this DecaGear HMD is not the first to arrive with that kind of resolution, which is what you implied.
            Yes, Pico’s products are business-focused, but Neo2’s $600 price is why I included it. No one said we should count only consumer releases…
            Just an upgrade to an existing design? By that logic, every HMD released so far is exactly that, an upgrade to an existing design.
            The only common thing between the “G1” and G2 is the number of pixels and refresh rate on paper. The actual displays are completely different. Different lenses, controllers, tracking system (similar, but vastly improved), facial interface, headstrap, audio solution…
            Anyways, no point in arguing. DecaGear will not be the first with this resolution, and will not be the last.

        • kraeuterbutter

          Qeust 2 wireless is also complete other thing !
          quest 2 has a processor which can handle the streaming
          this does headset does not..
          and we know what it costed to make a Vive or Rift or the Cosmos wireless !!!
          and this headset has nearly 4times the resolution of the Vive

          and they manage ist to make it wireless for 49,-
          good luck..

          sorry, but give them your 10 US$ if you realy believe that

          • Stefan

            I get you’re not familiar with actual component pricing, which is all right. But you should mind your tone, then.

            I reckon they can build this thing for 200~300 dollars each, controllers included, though it is hard to tell without knowing what’s actually in there.

            Now, here’s the thing: If you sell a hundred thousand units, from that 150 dollars difference there might be about two thirds going to the company, which would only be ten million dollars. That might sound much for an average-income person, but it is nothing for a tech company designing hardware.

            BUT if they manage to get alot of upfront investment (hoping for a much larger number of sales) and have relatively low R&D cost due to utilizing established tech, having some wunderkind talent on their team or some form of significant outside support, it might just work.

      • Loremipsum

        I really struggle to understand how you expect people to respond to you when you call their messages rubbish.
        And I really struggle to understand why you don’t just google every single question you asked.

      • Stefan

        How many consumer headsets are currently in development we know the specs of? Those panels are fairly standard today, it’s just that we don’t have much in terms of current hardware available to us. This is in no way a cost-driver.

        Wireless… you’re kidding, right? The Q1’s WiFi and decoding power isn’t really great, but it manages excellent wireless streaming with 2017 chips. Why shouldn’t this one?

        Finger tracking… CV1 had this in a basic form. Again, the question should be why this isn’t already standard.

        Face- and gaze tracking (not really eye tracking, as I understand it) can be done with really cheap cameras and almost no extra computing power, nowadays, thanks to ML.

        I can’t say if this product is legit or fake, but the fact that there is no comparable product from a larger company on the market or in the pipeline doesn’t say much about wether it could be done, but alot about how insignificant and small the consumer PCVR hardware market really is.

      • SacredScroll260

        who cares how many headsets have these if we get like 3 new headsets per year? By the standard he means the standard of the leading and actually relevant headsets, not every headset in existence. If the standard for a product was taken from every type of that product ever made then toyota would be considered a company that makes super cars. Also why are you talking about eye and face tracking like it’s some sort of magical $1000 product that nobody can afford? I’m using a $50 camera on my computer and face tracking is amazing for the apps I use. And how many vr headsets have a less than $450 rrp whatever the hell that is? Search up the price for the leading headset, the oculus quest 2, and ask yourself that again.

  • 3872Orcs

    Huh ok this is interesting at least. Now deliver some hardware to trusted reviewers and we’ll see.

    I have the Valve Index and what I want next in a similar specked headset is wireless and eye tracking, this Deca headset at least seems to cover that, so I’m intrigued. But I’m not giving up on 144hz and the ~130° field of view of the Index or the great headphones. I think I’ll personally wait and see what Valve offers up next before I purchase something new. Gabe Newell did hint about a new and improved headset in a resent interview. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1PQQ32rz78

    • The website is interesting, it looks like this company exited stealth recently?

      The steaming add-on:

      “The headset supports an add-on wireless device that connects onto the back of the headset strap to allow wireless gaming from the PC with WIFI 5 or 6.”

      Valve’s assistance:

      “On release, DecaGear 1 will support all VR games and applications in the Steam library. We’ve had frequent help from the Valve team with SteamVR integration and some aspects of the system’s development (thanks Valve).”

      Most interesting is what the founder has to say:

      https://www.deca.net/dr_vr_headset_built_especially_for_social_experiences_and_multiplayer_gaming/

    • mirak

      Vive Pro Eye got eye tracking wireless and OLED.
      I got a fullkit used only once for 600€.

    • Ad

      Tyler makes it sound like that headset would come at the end of 2021 at the earliest. Might even get delayed to come out the next year and use miniLED or something.

  • ymo1965

    Megadodo? think he’s been listening to too much Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy :)

  • Gonzax

    It sounds too good to be true but it looks great and the specs are promising. If the wireless works well and the FOV is good (not mentioned in the article) I would happily pay for it even if it is much more expensive than the announced price.
    But as I said, sounds a little unbelievable.
    It’s great that new headsets are coming, though, I can’t wait to see what Valve comes up with next.

  • Joey Gambino

    FOV?

    • James Cobalt

      Based on the warranted skepticism it sounds like there’s a decent chance the FOV will be zero.

      • Joey Gambino

        So, about the same as the Quest 2?

    • Renos Dickey

      I heard the FOV is 117°

      • gothicvillas

        Devs commented on YouTube – 114°

  • Ace of Spades

    I want one, HP G2 pre-order canceled!

    • Nicholas

      You must be joking XD

      • Ace of Spades

        If I was sure that its real then for sure ill get one instead HP G2

        • SacredScroll260

          if it IS real then it’ll be huge for the company and they’ll be able to make headsets even better than this one

  • Tailgun

    “Kuntzman… most recently the Managing Director at a now-defunct studio called Betastamp, which described itself as a sort of startup-idea incubator.”

    Ah, I always wondered whatever happened to Erlich Bachman. Maybe we’ll get Kuntzmanity to celebrate the occasion when this thing comes out.

  • LOL, $50 for the wireless module. The Wi-Gig antenna alone is around $100. So either they have a big cash cow like facebook, or I smell that smelly smell…

    • FuckNazis

      802.11AX is enough with 1GBPS

    • Ben Bega

      Its apparently 50$ for the battery. The wireless works over wifi 5 or 6 streaming, based on a post on their forum

      • Ad

        Is there a chip in the headset that would actually take the signal?

    • mepy

      If wireless was easy all the VR companies would make it.

    • TechPassion

      XR2 and WIFI 6? What’s the problem?!

    • Ad

      It’s not Wigig, I assume some decoder SoC if it exists at all.

  • Dave Graham

    If true this could be great, but only if I get proper blacks and not these milky greys from your typical LCD, Also a good FOV at least 150 degrees.

  • kraeuterbutter

    seems to be scam / Vaporware…
    until short they worked on a VR-MMO, collected money for that.. – nothing came

    now they collect Money for this headset
    all of the emplolys: unknown people in the industrie
    the company was named Asiaco PTE Ltd. before and did “Business managment”
    and now they want to bring a VR-set supperior to what we got from Carmacks team and co…

    no way

  • His Yolkiness

    On Twitter, DecalGear lists as being based in Singapore, but neither Deca nor Decagear is a registered business on the government-run registry.

    (There is an accounting firm under the name Deca.)

    • James Cobalt

      That’s because DecaGear is a brand name. The official company name is MEGADODO SIMULATION GAMES PTE. LTD., as shown at the bottom of their website. They are located at No 24, Sukhumvit soi 43, Watthana, 10110, Bangkok, Thailand.

      For a variety of reasons (likely related to manufacturing and/or taxes and/or talent acquisition and/or who knows), they have a registered address in Singapore at 531A UPPER CROSS STREET, #04-95, HONG LIM COMPLEX, SINGAPORE 051531.

      The reason it’s an accounting firm is they do foreign IP and business incorporation and representation. This is not unusual. This is standard business practice. You need a local entity to represent you; you don’t necessarily need to open up a physical office in that country to do your wheelings and dealings there.

      • His Yolkiness

        Thank you for the clarification.

  • Hokhmah

    Independent of whether this is scam/vaporware, the more interesting question is if the price of such a headset is realistic. I mean maybe 2K displays like the one used in Reverb G2 got cheaper over time and it doesn’t have any mobile hardware like the Quest/Q2. Cams for tracking are not very expensive from what I know.

    So til here it’s not that unlikely but now comes the additional stuff like the face tracking and motion controllers with finger tracking. I always thought the Knuckles are fairly expensive, but even if you can produce a somewhat similar experience for a lower price it still is one of the biggest cost drivers.

    DecaGear could just take mostly known components, technology, software, … that works well for building a good VR headset, although I don’t know how this would work out legally. Could be a strategy for keeping the price low though.

    Last but not least, the wireless adapter is maybe that cheap cause it isn’t a WiGig solution but dedicated Wi-Fi 6E. Would mean it’s also an adapter that works with compression but maybe more like a wifi HDMI/DP dongle.

    • Ad

      It’s obviously not WiGig, but if people will put up with VD then maybe we need a low end solution. Also if the Reverb G2 panels are cheaper now, is it possible to get them cut in a larger size for large FOV headsets?

    • Pingers Bingers

      Yeah, the controller price is the most peculiar thing to me. Even if you discount the price of the base stations, it’s hard to believe it can be that much cheaper than the Index, particularly since the controllers are said to include the same features as the Knuckles – so why are they so much cheaper?

      • SacredScroll260

        i’m not too sure of this answer since i don’t know the prices for the material used in this thing, but if i had to guess then decagear is sacrificing profit for a better headset and a more trustworthy brand name. If they can pull off all the things they claim they will, and at this price, the profit off each headset won’t be too much, but it gives people more trust in the brand and more importantly a better alternative to GODDAMN FACEBOOK for not a much higher price. If this thing comes out with everything it claims and gets good reviews, expect a lot more headsets from this company to start popping up. This could be massive for them.

  • mepy

    The wireless option is what makes this one really interesting, but I’ll believe that when I see it. So far HTC is the only company with a wireless solution, there must be a good reason for that.

    • mirak

      TP Cast had one.
      But it seems no one can do it at a reasonable price.

    • Ad

      If VD streaming is actually that good, it might be possible to just stick a decoding chip in there.

      • Stefan

        For me, it works flawlessly, with latency usually between 20 and 30ms, never exceeding 40 (as far as I can tell).

        I reckon the only reason FB hasn’t rolled out 1st-party WiFi-streaming support is that they fear the wrath of all those customers with badly set-up or hopelessly congested networks. That’s something they 1. can’t do anything about and 2. will have a hard time to explain to most consumers, so they’ll probably stick with wired. That Deca-HMD, on the other hand, seems to target a more core audience, which is alot more tech-savvy. Coupled with a dedicated WiFi-addon (that could potentially mitigate some of the issues) that makes it alot easier for them to implement this. I don’t get why Valve hasn’t done this already. Might have to do with what was available chipset-wise when they designed the Index.

        • Ad

          I think Valve wants WiGig ay. But 40 ms is a lot, how do you not notice?

          • Stefan

            Because it’s usually ~22ms. 39 is the highest I have ever seen, and that was only in my secondary playspace (and as it didn’t feel like it, it might just have been the odd spike). :)

  • leseki9

    Regarding the resolution please note that display manufacturers BOE and JDI are both manufacturing 2160×2160 LCD panels for some time. So more and more comapnies are going to take advantage of these panels, especially since they cost around 25 USD each. The virus probably hit smaller VR companies hard this year but I expect us to get back on track soon.
    At least as far as resolution is concerned this is not something special.

  • Samuel Peters

    What is the FOV on this? Really want something with a wider field of view!

  • Flip

    I honestly can’t wait for this it looks insane but then again it’s gonna take about 4 or 5 months for it. I want someone to get it early to talk about its pros and cons I need more info about this.

  • TechPassion

    Another and long interview with DecaGear team, November 5 2020, this time in VRChat. Very interesting:
    https://www.twitch.tv/videos/792642460