After the long wait, Magic Leap, the secretive augmented reality startup, finally unveiled its first AR headset. Releasing first as a ‘Creator Edition’, the so-called ‘Magic Leap One’ AR headset is said to start shipping in 2018.

While the company has shown its tech to journalists and celebrities alike, all impressions have been held within the strict confines of a non-disclosure agreement (NDA). Starting today, we now have a better picture of the final form-factor and styling of the headset, although hard specs are still under wraps.

Here’s every pertinent image we’ve scraped from their site so far:

The headset itself is going by the name Lightwear, which features an array of sensors – exactly how many and their individual purpose, we’re not sure yet. Two cables are seen trailing out the back of the Lightwear headset, although Rolling Stone reports these actually unite in a single cable on its way to the computing unit.

The headset, which has a real-time computer vision processor, reportedly contains four built-in microphones, external cameras to track the wearer and the world they’re in, and tiny high-end speakers built into the temples of the device to provide spatial audio. Magic Leap founder and CEO Rony Abovitz told Rolling Stone the headset incorporates “eye tracking, and you’re going to use gesture, our input system for most of the experience.”

The report describes Lightwear’s field of view (FOV) similar in size to “a VHS tape held in front of you with your arms half extended.”

image courtesy Magic Leap

Rolling Stone reports the headset will come in two sizes, and pieces like the forehead pad, nose pieces, and temple pads can all be customized to ensure a good fit. Before the company launches Magic Leap One, they’ll also take user’s glasses prescriptions to build corrective lenses directly into the headset—possibly hinting at a decidedly premium pricetag.

The system comes with a small mobile computer that’s clipped to the user’s waist, which Magic Leap calls the ‘Lightpack’. Tethered by a single cable, the company says it offers “[h]igh-powered processing and graphics, streamlined in a lightweight pack that stays right by your side.” Abovitz told Rolling Stone the company is still working on battery optimization.

SEE ALSO
Google Brings ARCore 1.0 to Multiple Flagship Smartphones, Google Lens Preview Soon

A 6DoF motion controller, which is dubbed simply ‘Control’, features a touchpad, “force control and haptic feedback.” Rolling Stone says it also features an “array of buttons.”

There’s no pricing information yet – only a signup form to fill out to register your interest in the Magic Leap One Creator Edition.

The company is also releasing access to the headset’s software development kit (SDK) “along with all of the tools, documentation, learning resources and support you’ll need to begin your journey.” This is said to come in early 2018.

SEE ALSO
Eye-tracking is a Game Changer for VR That Goes Far Beyond Foveated Rendering

In September 2017, it was rumored the multi-billion dollar Magic Leap could be shipping their first device to “a small group of users within six months,” and that the company would also take on a Series D investment led by Temasek Holdings Pte., a Singaporean venture capital firm. The rumor regarding its Series D  turned out to be true, but we were left waiting on any word of surrounding the headset itself.

Info is still thin on the ground. We’ll be updating this piece as it comes in.

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  • impurekind

    Man, the controllers for these things look more and more like my over 12 year old designed by the day. Go to inceptional.com and type in “Ahead of the Nintendo/NX curve, again” to the search box for an example of what I’m talking about.

    • GigaSora

      Yeah. Really just an opinion but the aesthetic design of the headset seems pretty wonky/cheap looking.

      • Mei Ling

        It’s not bad and it’s not good. Worst case scenario would have been a very clunky looking HMD with a much larger form factor; that isn’t the case here which is a positive depending on how you see it.

      • impurekind

        Agreed.

    • Lucidfeuer

      These were some nice concepts. I’m too waiting for a universal physical digital/analog/haptic “reactive” controller. Doing this with screens is easy today, nano-haptic feedbacks a bit less, and button shape modification very complex (https://www.technologyreview.com/s/508106/a-shape-shifting-smartphone-touch-screen/). The way this work in VR with the Steam controller or Pans is already cool.

      • impurekind

        Thanks. 10-15 years ahead of the curve–but I’m sitting here poor as can be. lol

        • Lucidfeuer

          Well we live in a more and more meaningless executive for executive world, so yes things do not only have to be conceived but also created and produced by the same person :/

          • Sponge Bob

            yeah, right

            that’s why big tech execs worked so hard to destroy US patent system
            its all about money and who has more of it – nothing meaningless about it
            Read Karl Marx

          • Lucidfeuer

            So the opposite of Das Kapital…long discussion to explain, but yes this is meaningless. These companies, like the rest of the world nations, are self-destructing themselves because of speculative and financial actors.

    • Sponge Bob

      controllers are most likely useless – same as GearVR or Daydream – rotation only
      -a fancy laser pointer
      I would believe in 6DoF if I saw a refined version of Oculus Touch or something like that
      What I see in those images just does not cut for 6DoF
      (unless there is some big secret they are hiding somewhere and not showing in those photoshopped images)

      AND without high precision 6DoF controllers the whole “high-end” (and high price) AR headset is a joke

      • impurekind

        I hear ya and agree.

  • impurekind

    I’ll wait until I see some hands-on previews and reviews before I drink the Kool-Aid. For now, it’s just another VR headset from what I can see (possibly with slightly better tech in some ways)–and I’ve not been impressed by a single one of those yet.

    • Mei Ling

      It is not a VR headset.

      • impurekind

        I meant to say AR. I’ve fixed it now.

    • Bryan Ischo

      I think the product will flop big time and this will be bad for VR/AR investment, but the upside is that whatever display tech they have invented that they used to justify the investment money, might advance the state of the art.

      • Mei Ling

        Regardless if the device turns out to be unsuccessful they have advanced human technology in some form (read the Rolling Stones article); the only way to progress is by putting your theories to work and taking risks which is what they have done.

  • Lucidfeuer

    They could’ve used prototype pictures instead of CAD renders, but at least we have the image.

    Still no indicator that there’s much differentiation from an HoloLens, ODG R9 or Daqri. In fact there is no chance that this is any different from these non-products besides FOV and “Digital Lightfield” rendering.

    Now let’s see how they’re going to justify the ~$2B investments…

    • Downvote King

      So it’s no different from other products except for producing lightfield images your eyes can focus on like real objects, with a wider field of view? What more do you want?

      • yag

        You can also add more opacity, if the “seen through” videos shown are legit.

        • Downvote King

          True, the ability to produce opaque objects is huge – particularly going forward as the FOV expands to allow it to crossover into more traditional VR experiences. Either way, for a developer kit especially I don’t see what there is to complain about. I guess it hasn’t cured cancer yet, so there’s that.

    • LowRezSkyline

      Or a 1500 buck price tag for that matter.

      Reminds me of the 3D0 for some reason.

    • chuan_l

      There really isn’t much difference —
      All use the same optics since ML couldn’t resolve chromatic aberration issues with FSD in time for 2018. Hololens still has best pixel resolution where R8 / R9 have better brightness and around 50° field of view. They even copied the Hololens launch interface concepts.

  • Ian Shook

    Built in headphones would’ve been nice. Sort of like Rift’s but less wonky.

    • Nate Vander Plas

      There are built-in speakers, apparently, similar to Hololens. I haven’t tried Halolens, but a friend told me the speakers are surprisingly good for not being on your ear.

    • Mei Ling

      It has built in speakers on the headband.

  • NooYawker

    Yesterday they released more cgi videos, today they release a photoshopped picture of the actual device. Those aren’t even pictures of the actual device! It’s like they’re trolling everyone. They didn’t even place the goggles on his face properly.

  • Foreign Devil

    They FINALLY have something to show at least. So is the puck the entire processing power or you also need to plug it into a high end PC? So many questions remain!

  • Sponge Bob

    Wait a minute…

    The so called “6DoF Motion Controller” in the photos CANNOT be tracked with headset cameras due do its small size and form factor – easy occlusion by user’s hand (even if they put IR LEDs all over controller’s surface)
    All they can do is use IMU sensors which sort of work for rotational tracking (with some drift correction still necessary) but not for positional tracking…

    Is this a scam, some vaporware again ???

    6DoF high-precision motion controller is a MUST for any high-end VR or AR headset

    So I expect the answer from Magic Leap: is this just IMU sensors inside their “6DoF controller” or more ?
    If its just IMUs then the controller is useless, just like GearVR controller is useless

    Hello, Magic Leap ???

    • Miqa

      It’s not like cameras are the only way to achieve positional information.

      • Sponge Bob

        Do you know any other way (except IMUs which don’t even know their initial position once the power is turned on) ???

        • Miqa

          I believe Razer Hydras used some form of magnetic tracking.

          However, these guys have had SO MUCH funding. They can definitely create something completely different.

          • Sponge Bob

            Razer Hydra used magnetic tracking tech from Polhemus
            Just look at the size of those coils inside Razer Hydra basestation and also power consumption AND Razer Hydra controllers are tethered – not wireless

            If this tech could work for mobile VR/AR it would already replace
            all other types of tracking

            Billions of dollars invested do not negate Laws of Physics

            You only have 3 choices for positional tracking:

            1) optical
            2) acoustical
            3) magnetic

            Your pick ???

          • Miqa

            They could be nuclear for all we know. All I’m saying is that they would have funds to explore a lot of options, I’m sure they have some clue what they are doing.

          • Jim Cherry

            Companies called magic leap for a reason ;)

          • Sponge Bob

            Dude, there are NO other options:
            EITHER electromagnetic waves/fields (optical, magnetic, rf)
            OR acoustic waves

          • Miqa

            I’m not claiming that it is a specific implementation.
            But really there are other options. Theoretically you could at least use nuclear radiation, perhaps gravity too.
            Because you don’t understand how it will work after looking at two pictures doesn’t mean that it won’t work. I’m out.

          • Sponge Bob

            nuclear radiation ??? :-)

            thanks but no thanks, dude

            gravity is already used for 3DoF orientation tracking – no innovation here

            until someone takes this controller apart or at the very least provides real (not photo-shopped) pictures there is no point
            in discussing it further

    • Nate Vander Plas

      I also thought I heard they will have hand tracking. Maybe it uses the hand tracking capability to determine where your hand is holding the controller?

      • Sponge Bob

        Hm..

        Then why would you need a controller ?

        (open hand) tracking works (Leap Motion) its just not well suited for certain types of productivity applications targeted by Magic Leap

        • Downvote King

          I feel like you answered your own question

        • Michael Oder

          Hand tracking seems to work ok in existing implementations, but selection with hands is slow and imprecise. By having a controller the can provide high performance responsiveness and haptic feedback.

          Additionally using a hand as a input device looks great in demos, but it is exhausting in practice and socially impractical for many use cases. With a controller you can rest your hand on your lap or a table and use tilts and swipes on the touchpad for extended use.

          • Sponge Bob

            Correction:

            *Open hand* tracking works OK

            here you have closed hand holding a small controller

            additionally, Leap Motion uses projected IR light to track hands

            Try it outside under direct sunlight

            What’s the point of AR if you can’t use it outdoors ?

      • brubble

        I know where my hand will not be…opening my wallet for this over hyped gimmick.
        Hmmm, I wonder if Chris Roberts is partnered up with this company?

    • Maciej Soinski

      You expect too much from graphic designers. They are not tech guys, they were supposed to create something fancy to give magic leap guys another half a year.

      • Sponge Bob

        yeah
        another half a year.. and another half a billion

    • dk

      what do u mean gear vr controller is useless …….gear vr or any mobile headset without a 3dof controller is sort of useless :P……..interacting without at least a 3dof controller is super crappy and annoying

      also they mention something about hands tracking in the article ….posibly the same level as the hololens

      but yeah the controller situation with the good enough leap is interesting

    • trekkie

      I wonder why they need a controller when it looks like they have great depth sensors (since they can extract the 3D mesh of the room) which enables hand tracking like in Leapmotion.

      • Sponge Bob

        high-precision controller is a MUST
        touch screen never replaced computer mouse for productivity apps
        likewise, hand tracking will never be able to compete with ergonomic easy to use and precise controller for productivity applications

        • trekkie

          True.

  • Nate Vander Plas

    Gotta say, I’m pretty pumped that they FINALLY showed us something! For those complaining that they’re only showing a rendered CAD model, that is probably also the case for most products out there, including the iPhone. The design for these glasses is pretty goofy though. Looks like something from an 80s sci fi film. You’d think with billions of dollars they could afford a better product designer, but of course, none of us know all the technical constraints they were working with.

  • Muzufuzo

    Good I was ready to be disappointed.
    Except that is even worse than I had imagined….

    • Bryan Ischo

      Aside from it being cool to dump on Magic Leap, do you have any specific criticisms?

      • Muzufuzo

        It doesn’t stand up to the hype the made over the years.

        • Bryan Ischo

          That’s not specific.

          Here, I’ll give a free specific criticism as an example:

          The opaque nature of the headset means that you lose a significant portion of your field of view. So it’s going to be like looking through goggles, just like current VR headsets, only worse, because you’re going to be prevented from seeing potentially important things in the real world (such as the edge of that desk that your shin is about to smash into) in a headset whose purpose is meant to allow you to move around freely in the real world.

          • dmbfk

            No he did you there! you called him out and he gave a perfectly legit criticism, it just wasn’t as wordy as you hoped. He got you Bryan. He done you good!

          • Bryan Ischo

            Wrong. “It doesn’t stand up to the hype” is devoid of anything specific. *What* doesn’t stand up to the hype?

            Although maybe you are just trying to make joke, it’s not very clear from what you wrote …

          • dmbfk

            The hype is specific Bryan, I don’t know what kind of tism would lead you to classify it otherwise.

          • Bryan Ischo

            What is the specific criticism? “It sucks” is not specific. But I can tell that you have nothing useful to add to this discussion so, bye …

          • dmbfk

            No Bryan the original criticism was that the product was hyped not that it sucks. What you’ve done there is borrow somebody else’s contribution and tried to shift the argument on to that. The OP said it was hyped and you said that criticism wasn’t specific but it was. It is specific in that the product has received undue adulation unfairly raising it’s profile. Sorry to have to explain things to you in minutia but I don’t like the way try to slither out of something stupid you said originally.

          • Bryan Ischo

            This is a really dumb argument and this is literally the very last time I am going to engage with you on it. His original statement was “It is worse than I expected”. This implies two things:

            1. He expected it to be bad.
            2. It is bad.

            I wanted to know what he thought was bad about what he sees, not just a useless statement dumping on the product.

            It’s not even that I disagree with him – I just wanted details.

            His response was “it doesn’t live up to the hype”. That is not specific either. What aspect of it doesn’t live up to the hype? Let’s get some specifics to talk about.

          • dmbfk

            You wanted to know what’s bad about what he sees? He told you idiot. It was hyped. That means what he sees does not live up to all the promise and hyperbole. Pretty much the same experience your wife’s been through since you got married.

          • Bryan Ischo

            My blocklist is full of stupid people, so you should feel right at home. Welcome!

          • dmbfk

            You’re right Bryan I do feel at home surrounded by stupid people, no more so than after a conversation with you on Disqus.

          • brubble

            Gee-zus man, you need to loosen up a little. Are you just upset he isnt holding your new dream device aloft on a silken pillow in great enough praise? You’re acting like a Star-Citizen backer/zealot.

          • Bryan Ischo

            Apparently you can’t understand what you read? Try harder next time, OK?

          • brubble

            Hyuk!

        • MosBen

          We hardly know anything about it yet to know whether it holds up to the hype. Hololens has an extremely limited FOV compared to the Rift or Vive. Magic Leap may not have as big of an FOV as we would like, but it may end up at the 110 degree FOV of the Rift and Vive, which would be a big improvement over Hololens. Or maybe it’ll be slightly better. We just don’t know yet. But otherwise, we just don’t know enough to be super disappointed yet, unless your expectations were crazy out of whack.

          • Bryan Ischo

            Sorry, by FOV here I meant the user’s FOV for any kind of visual input. Hololens has a limited FOV for rendered content, but the user’s view of the real world is basically unobstructed. Not so with this Magic Leap device, where the user’s view of the real world is obstructed by opaque side walls of the glasses.

          • MosBen

            That’s fair, though I think that in the scheme of things it’s a fairly small problem. If, for instance, this headset allowed for a 160 degree FOV of rendered content at a fairly high fidelity with good tracking for both the headset and controller and all for a competitive price, a limited FOV for regular vision wouldn’t bother me too much. Of course, Magic Leap’s continued secrecy is starting to look more like they’re having problems getting their tech ready for prime time, so I’m not holding my breath that all of that stuff will actually be true.

          • Veron

            we know it wont have a 110 degree FOV for rendered content.
            you didn’t read the linked article?

          • Get Schwifty!

            If people’s expectations were out of whack it might have something to do with the degree of hype and false advertising present in their videos. Can’t blame people for pointing out the discrepancy….

      • fuyou2

        Specific?? Are you fucking kidding.. How about everything about it sux.

        • Bryan Ischo

          You are too cute. “Everything sux” is apparently a specific criticism. Like how interesting it is to read that you think that “everything sux” instead of actually gaining some insights into what the actual issues are.

        • trekkie

          How come guys like Muzufuzo and fuyou are even here on this forum???? These must be left wing Bernie supporters who have been protesting all year long and live in their mothers basement. Their parents give them cash to buy cool gadgets. Apart from that whats left is vacuum between the ears. And they come here to act all smart and knowledgeable. Putting down others is a cool pastime among these unemployed freeloaders.

          • brubble

            Nice one, by your eloquently composed comment you’re really calling the kettle black.

        • brubble

          Easy there, youre interrupting Brian while hes trying to build his new Battlestar Galactica model.

      • brubble

        Hey Yeah! Ive got a really good one -> a vhs tape sized FOV at half an arms length away….a vhs tape. Still, Id like to try it out to see what all the fuss was about before I can rightfully claim my disappointment is complete.

        What more will there be to criticize? Well we’ll just have to wait and see what will happen with this thing once all the sparkly dazzle wow factor of new tech wears off just like it did with HMDs. I feel its illogical to accept all of their propaganda pictures as accurate representations of actual fidelity and instead we’ll be greeted by washed out ghostly low rez images plastered on….a vhs sized FOV half an arms length away.

        Hype train has been reduced to a dinky car. But again, we’ll just have to wait and see.

      • WyrdestGeek

        FWIW, *my* criticism of Magic Leap is they have ridden the hype train about five times longer than they should have.

        They need to ship product or stfu.

        That is just my opinion, of course. Though it appears to be shared by a number of other folks here.

    • dk

      it’s good enough leap

  • superdonkey

    expect this to be very expensive and not that useful.

    • Mei Ling

      Porn anyone?

      • brubble

        meh, even that would/will be a disappointment.

  • Duane Aakre

    My guess – before these become available to the general public, Apple will steal their thunder. And Apple has much, much deeper pockets than these guys. I mean $2 billion is what, a couple weeks profit for them? And who are developers going to want to work for – Apple or this unknown entity?

    • Bryan Ischo

      Apple is not going to blow their bank roll on tech that will never make money. Magic Leap will though, because their bank roll exists solely for the purpose of making a large bet on a new technology.

    • MosBen

      People have been suggesting that Apple will build a car that’s better than anything out there, or put out a VR headset that’s better than anything out there, for literally many years at this point. And while I’m sure that Apple has people working on ideas for both projects on some level, until they actually announce something we shouldn’t just assume that they’re ahead of everyone else. They’re phones are good, but not leaps and bounds better than their competitors, as is the case with their computers, an any other product that they make. Having a ton of money to throw at a product certainly helps, but it’s not the only thing necessary to build a great product.

    • brubble

      I feel Apple only invests in tech that isnt sh*tty.

  • sebrk

    I’ve been developing for HoloLens for some time now. While it holds promise (in technology) it is utter garbage. FOV is so limited you instantly get annoyed and performance is sub par. To top it off it runs UWP which is a hot mess. Anyway, I hope this will add some improvements like wider FOV, general performance and outside use.

    • 12Danny123

      There’s nothing wrong with UWP at all. I don’t see why people on HoloLens hate would it. If you think this is going to use Win32, you’re delusional, Microsoft will never allow that to happen.

  • MosBen

    Many people around the web are complaining that this looks goofy, mostly because this announcement doesn’t provide us with enough information to critique it in other ways. But I don’t really care if it looks goofy. I guess maybe people were assuming that Magic Leap would release their first product and suddenly everyone would be wearing VR/AR HMDs all day, every day? That they would leap frog over the current standard tech in this area that VR would suddenly become indispensable to everyday life? That is an unrealistic expectation. These may be a bit goofy looking, but this is also the first generation of product that they’re releasing. It’s also likely going to be expensive. All that matters to me is whether their tech represents an improvement in some way over what we’re currently using, and we just don’t have enough information yet to know. I do like that the computing is put into the belt-clip unit. I’ve thought for a while that doing that would allow for a good middle ground between a beefy PC that requires a tether and the mobile computing parts that will fit into an HMD without making it too heavy or hot.

    • Get Schwifty!

      Considering their backing… if this is the best they have to start I feel sorry for their VC investors…

  • kosmo1982

    this aint even a picture just a render. i suspect its gonna be shit like all other AR/VR shit

  • Jay degaris

    FOV , VHS tape held at arms length, WTF, that is like 20 degrees! What a bunch of liars. Who gives a shit about the tracking when it’s the optics and the display they were hyping up. Here is my design, I think it’s better, it has 240 degree FOV with eye tracking and real fur! it’s only $50 I am taking pre-orders now

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a7456a6303020400d18832d394b9648e707cd02a4ec23710d87efa5b0d0bc37f.jpg

    • Hivemind9000

      Arms half extended. So about 40 degrees maybe. Still shitty and it doesn’t have the nice fur lining yours does. Where’s the kickstarter link?

    • brubble

      sold

    • arielwollinger

      best post ever!

  • Facts

    Disappointed by the horrible field of view, this is another google lens/microsoft holo lens gimmick.I believe true AR should have good if not full field of view. We are like 10 years away from good augmented reality.

  • bud

    so this is what all the fuss has been about and this much money makes some thing this under whelming?

    I think people will stay with full bore VR headsets and let AR mature for another 5 to 6 years imo….

    it looks nice but spec wise I would not even que for 5 or 10 minutes to put that on.

    Maybe the experience with in that 20degress demonstrates what will be ultimately possible and it is hugely exciting and impressive…?

  • brubble

    Really!? Really?, a vhs tape held half an arms length away!?! Youve gotta be kidding me, thats a pretty bloody disappointing sounding FOV. Fancy new tech or not that FOV sounds like utter sh*t. I set my expectation bar really low for stuff like this but this cruises right under said bar with tons of headroom to spare. Of course Id have to give it a try before my 85% pass is bumped to 100% put off. Magic Leap indeed.

  • ipollute

    I called this a nice kids toy when it was first announced and I got flak for it. Seems like I was correct. This is the equivalent of the classic red 3d viewmaster from 50 years ago lol.

  • Barbara

    Google is paying 97$ per hour,with weekly payouts.You can also avail this.
    On tuesday I got a great new Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $11752 this last four weeks..with-out any doubt it’s the most-comfortable job I have ever done .. It sounds unbelievable but you wont forgive yourself if you don’t check it..

  • theonlyrealconan

    Rift and Vive release at 110 FOV. Check. Pimax follows up with 200 FOV. Check. Magic Leap hits evenone with VHS. Check mate my friends! (And a merry christmas)

  • arielwollinger

    Soooo, the FOV of Microsoft’s Hololens is more than double of Magic Hype