HTC Creative Labs’s free native VR video player has received an upgrade with a new browser interface. The team has also partnered with Vimeo, offering a curated selection of streamable VR video content.

Explained in a post on the official Vive blog, which also covers the major CES announcements of the Vive Pro and Wireless Adaptor, Vive Video’s 2.0 update aims to solve “the discovery and acquisition problem for VR video content by delivering a large catalog of high quality streaming video directly to VR headsets.”

New features and UI upgrades include a mini-browser interface that allows catalog access without leaving the current video, subtitle and audio track selection for local videos, and the ability to change the viewing environment.

In addition, Vive Video has a new partnership with open video platform Vimeo, offering a “curated selection of Vimeo content will be made available to browse and view in a highly optimized native VR experiences within Vive Video-compatible headsets.”

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“Whether we’re building our own tools in-house or partnering with other innovative platforms, Vimeo is committed to the future of storytelling and finding new ways to support our creators,” said Christophe Gillet, GM of Vimeo’s Creator Platform. “Not only does the integration with Vive Video showcase some of Vimeo’s highest quality, human-curated content within the VR experience, but it also gives those creators an exciting new way to expose their work and engage with audiences.”

Vive Video launched a year ago with support for 2D, 3D, 180˚ and 360˚ content, and is currently available for the Vive headset via Viveport or Steam, and for Google Daydream devices via the Daydream Store. It is also coming to Vive Wave, HTC’s open platform and toolset for mobile VR devices.

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The trial version of Microsoft’s Monster Truck Madness probably had something to do with it. And certainly the original Super Mario Kart and Gran Turismo. A car nut from an early age, Dominic was always drawn to racing games above all other genres. Now a seasoned driving simulation enthusiast, and former editor of Sim Racer magazine, Dominic has followed virtual reality developments with keen interest, as cockpit-based simulation is a perfect match for the technology. Conditions could hardly be more ideal, a scientist once said. Writing about simulators lead him to Road to VR, whose broad coverage of the industry revealed the bigger picture and limitless potential of the medium. Passionate about technology and a lifelong PC gamer, Dominic suffers from the ‘tweak for days’ PC gaming condition, where he plays the same section over and over at every possible combination of visual settings to find the right balance between fidelity and performance. Based within The Fens of Lincolnshire (it’s very flat), Dominic can sometimes be found marvelling at the real world’s ‘draw distance’, wishing virtual technologies would catch up.