Megadodo Simulation Games, the Singapore-based startup behind the upcoming PC VR headset DecaGear, announced that its hip-based VR locomotion device DecaMove has generated over $350,000 in sales over the course of its month-long preorder campaign.

The small puck-like device was designed to improve navigating in VR by tying the direction of locomotion to your hips, shifting it away from the typical methods of hand and head-relative movement. The device clips to your belt, sends data over to an included Bluetooth dongle, and essentially eliminates thumbstick-based locomotion.

DecaMove is said to support SteamVR-compatible headsets, including Valve Index, Oculus Rift S, Oculus Quest (via Link), HP Reverb G2, HTC Vive/Pro, HTC Cosmos, Samsung Odyssey, and DecaGear 1.

“This little accessory allows you to navigate with your body, freeing your hands for interaction and your head to spectate around freely,” the company says its website. “Hip based navigation is natural, it brings immersiveness to the next level and also helps to reduce motion sickness. It contributes to the overall posture of your in-game character and will send haptic feedback when you get hit.”

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Megadodo says it’s already sold over 6,000 DecaMove units, which brings it to over $350,000 USD in revenue. Priced at $59, the company hopes to ship out its first consumer units starting in June 2021.

Although the preorder campaign has officially ended, the company says in a blog post it still has enough capacity to manufacture more units right away, with shipping coming as early as August 2021. The company says its $59 pricing will stay the same “until this capacity is met.” DecaMove is said to launch at $69 when it goes on direct sale in January 2022.

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  • Ad

    This is really cool, the thing is note is that I think a lot of these people maybe should get a SteamVR tracker since decamove is hardware agnostic.

    • Alex Spacek

      yep. I use an old vive wand in a fanny pack and it works perfectly.

  • I’ve been using their “Decamove” Android app on my old pixel smartphone, and paired to “Decagear” app on my Win10 PCVR rig.

    Works beautifully with my valve Index, Boneworks feels magical with hip driven navigation, just tuck the pixel into my sweatpants waistband, the screen is slightly cracked so no concerns over accidental damage using for VR

    Generous of the developers to release this as a free solution, this bodes well for their VR aspirations.

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  • Andrew Jakobs

    But when will they actually release their decagear, they said May 2021, but it’s almost the end of May with no headset on the horizon.

    • TechPassion

      Normal. Huge undertaking and this is a startup.

    • Adrian Meredith

      the website says 1st batch shipping Q4 2021

  • Trenix

    Am I the only one that realized they were shooting at the guy’s private rather than the person’s head? Who does that? Aside from that, this is neat but still it kills the immersion. I don’t get why it’s so hard to track someone lifting their feet up and down to move forward. It’s really that simple, the hip is nice add-on but the locomotion is still bad.

  • Andross

    I have tested it with my phone but i am not pretty sure it’s a good idea.
    first of all, i doubt that the decamove device has something different from phones that prevent totally interferences… because yes, the controllers like oculus touch have magnetometer itself, and whenv you put them near the phone it goes mad. when you play the game and move the controller near the phone on the waist well, it stops working good.

    second, only a single magnetometer is never perfect, so i really want to know if the decamove has something more than a phone…

    and last but not the least, on the paper seems more intuitive, but when i tested it, even when it worked, something was weird… moving with analog it’s already an unreal thing to do, and it’s pretty weird to move your head independently and at the ame time move the analogue direction “checking” your body position… it’s not natural at all, it will be maybe only when your hands are not moving and attached to your body… otherwise the analog direction is still referring to something that is not visible in the virtual world…

    sorry for my bad english, but btw i suggest to test it even a little with your phone to discover what i mean and why it’s not natural at all…

    and by the way, developers say you can put the decamove everywhere you want, but it’s not true. the calibration is only for stabilize the sensor, and the software on the PC has not a default position config, so you can’t decide where to put the “in front” position.

  • Jesse Kindwall

    It always annoys me when someone criticizes teleportation as “immersion breaking”, then proceeds to show off a locomotion strategy that is even more immersion breaking than teleportation.

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  • This is the stupidest VR accessory I have yet seen.