HTC announced today that its new Vive Cosmos headset will be priced at $700 with a release date of October 3rd. Pre-orders for the headset are open starting today.

HTC is finally spilling the beans on Cosmos. The company has done plenty of teasing in the past few months, so right up front let’s take a look at the specs:

  • Headband: Halo style with flip-up visor
  • Displays: Dual 3.4″ LCD diagonal, IPD adjustment
  • Resolution: 1,440 × 1,700 pixels per eye (2,880 × 1,700 pixels combined)
  • Refresh rate: 90 Hz
  • Field of view: 110 degrees
  • Audio: Built-in stereo headphones
  • Required PC connectivity: USB 3.0, DisplayPort 1.2
  • Peripheral ports: USB-C 3.0, proprietary connection to mods
  • Tracking: Inside-out (6 cameras), optional add-on for SteamVR Tracking
  • Weight: 651 grams (1.43 pounds)
  • Vive Wireless Adapter support: Yes, sold separately with attach kit. (Available PCIe slot required)

Positioned as the follow-up to the original Vive, the company is hoping the headset can please two camps: early-adopter enthusiasts who bought into the SteamVR ecosystem and new customers looking for a more user-friendly experience.

SEE ALSO
Hands-on: Vive Cosmos Aims to Reboot the Vive Experience

While Cosmos uses inside-out tracking out of the box, the headset supports swappable faceplate ‘Mods’ which can offer additional functionality. The default faceplate adds two extra tracking cameras to the headset (for a total of six), but HTC has also announced an optional faceplate which will support SteamVR Tracking, making Cosmos compatible with the same Lighthouse base stations used for the original Vive (this will require separate controllers that also support SteamVR Tracking).

Image courtesy HTC

The company calls this the Vive Cosmos External Tracking Mod, and says it will be priced under $200, though it won’t be available until Q1 2020. HTC says that future faceplates will offer further expanded functionality. More details on the SteamVR Tracking Mod here.

New users, or those who want to ditch the SteamVR Tracking base stations, will get a complete inside-out tracked experience right out of the box, which includes two motion controllers that are also tracked by the headset.

Image courtesy HTC

While Vive Cosmos supports Steam and SteamVR content, HTC is shifting the user experience toward their own Viveport platform. While Viveport is still based on SteamVR/OpenVR, the company is taking over some of the Steam user-experience with a new in-VR dashboard called the ‘Lens’ which will let users browse through their library, search for new content, and toggle some settings. The company has also created a new ‘home’ space called Origin which will act as the default starting space when you jump into VR. The Lens will seamlessly show content from both SteamVR and the Viveport store, HTC says, and our understanding is that users will be able to ditch Lens and Origin for the pure SteamVR experience if they choose.

Image courtesy HTC

Vive Cosmos is available for pre-order starting today and will launch on October 3rd. Priced at $700, HTC is offering 12 months of the company’s Viveport Infinity VR content subscription service as a pre-order bonus, though all Cosmos headsets will include 6 months of access in the box. HTC says pre-orders will also be available from Amazon, Best Buy, B&H Photo, GameStop, Newegg, and Walmart.

HTC has previously teased that Vive Cosmos could plug into other devices like a smartphone, but the company isn’t making any announcements on that front; at launch it is poised purely as a PC VR headset.

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  • Ratm

    Instead of a software hack to use steam vr tracking ,you get the unique ” sorry i used to have 4 cameras ” extra plate. K…

  • Ratm

    Where are the- wtf!same tech with worse parts and same size – comments?

    • kakek

      You just made one.

    • MW

      Htc: there are plenty of idiots with money.

    • Trenix

      Worse parts?

      • Ratm

        Lcd? That alone always brake the deal for me.
        They even copied the failed compilation using halo+ strap.They could had just research and do it better.
        Instead of having the (late) two cameras build in you get extra weight faceplate.

        • Trenix

          I’ll give you the LCD part. As for the halo and strap, I think it might be the better option if it’s done correctly and is actually comfortable. I remember all the times I had to take off my headset and my hair ended up greasing the lenses because of the inconvenient way that it had to be taken off. Vive said that the cosmos has improved comfort over the original. Having only two cameras for tracking is terrible for gaming. Also they can be switched out to support base stations.

          I donno, we’ll see what will happen. I’m pretty certain I’m going to get it because it’s perfect for my current situation. It’s better than Oculus Quest and S and I just don’t have the room for an Index. Also the Index has no future in portability or being used wireless.

  • Virtual Funkality

    Ater over 3 years these minor upgrades and (even downgrades) by Rift S, Index and Cosmos is disappointing. (The Quest is an advancement in portability and great for the industry). The others have been lackluster. I would have thought that by the four year mark we would have wider FOV (Pimax got it right but some see distortion though I don’t experience it), Higher Resolution OLED, Wireless standard, better control options (hated the Index controllers button placement and prefer the Touch)… and better price point. Maybe PC hardware still needs to catch up.
    Everyone has their favorite (and get tribal about it).. but can we all agree it’s time for a giant step forward?

    • MosBen

      I think that it’s likely that the first generation of HMDs weren’t particularly profitable, both because production pipelines had to be established and the market for VR was relatively small. With this next generation the companies more or less have their production pipelines figured out, but want/need to sell more units to start making money. And the way that you do that, especially if you’re relying on people powering an HMD with a PC, is by keeping system requirements as low as possible. Your average person doesn’t have an RTX video card, and really most don’t even have a video card at all. Asking people to do a big upgrade in addition to buying an expensive piece of tech is a big ask indeed.

      Unless and until the VR market is large enough that expensive niche products have a large enough consumer base to succeed, we should expect to see incremental improvements with an eye toward price.

      • Lucidfeuer

        The VR market will not be large enough until these products are actually not niche but reach a decent first iteration. By stalling the iterations, innovations and options of VR, these companies are effectively making the market stagnant, and needless to remind that a market cannot remain stagnant indefinitely.

        The number of VR projects coming in (at least in my agency and those I know of) has in fact effectively started to decrease since late 2018, at the exception of China which is eventually going to reach the same VR fatigue and disinterest as the west despite all their investments, in fact they’re probably going to go faster.

        • MosBen

          You’ve been beating this drum for literal years. But from what we know, the Quest is selling quite well, there doesn’t seem to be any plan for Sony to abandon the PSVR, which is also doing fairly well, etc. Your prognostications are seeming quite Nostradamian at this point.

          • Lucidfeuer

            Right continue living in your fantasy world, while I actually see the market’s demand evolutions first-hand. The Quest has had a nice launch comparable to the PSVR while not being sustainable like the PSVR.

          • MosBen

            You’ve been predicting VR’s demise every year since 2016. You predicted that VR couldn’t possibly survive as a niche product that slowly gained users, but the years have passed and though VR remains a niche hobby it has continued to trundle along with slow but steady growth. You speculated that it could never succeed at its current state of technology, but it’s continued to see new products that introduce evolutionary improvements.

            It is, of course, possible that this generation of the VR industry will suffer some kind of massive collapse, but with each passing year that seems less and less likely. All that you’ve proven is that your prognostication powers aren’t terribly reliable.

          • Lucidfeuer

            Read your comment again. What you say is exactly, and specifically what I said, except that I’ve not predicted VR’s demise. I’ve explained exactly what your purport: that things going as they are, there’ll -probably- be a big collapse before this market become a real one. Now wether this is likely or unlikely is all what the prediction game is about.

          • vexdestroyer 123

            “except that I’ve not predicted VR’s demise” Explain how?
            “I’ve explained exactly what your purport: that things going as they are, there’ll -probably- be a big collapse before this market become a real one. Now wether this is likely or unlikely is all what the prediction game is about” Okay listen pal, there will be NO collapse anytime soon, VR will keep improving and keep evolving as time goes on. This is a new hobby for people to enjoy, a fast growing hobby and people are buying VR systems as we speak, and enjoying them and probably playing some VRChat or Rec Room and even Beat Saber. So please, research what you are talking about to make sure its correct, or not even make comments about this at all.

          • Lucidfeuer

            Okay kiddo, welcome to VR and see you in 2 years

          • vexdestroyer 123

            Mhm

          • reallitysence

            “while I actually see the market’s demand evolutions first-hand” .. dude, you see nothing, You have no idea what you are talking about. You have been wrong for years, and still you claim to see market demands evolutions??. what a joke.

          • vexdestroyer 123

            Yep

          • vexdestroyer 123

            When people don’t understand what their talking about and yet still claim to know what they are talking about and have been prooved wrong over the years.. God you are a joke, an absolute joke

          • vexdestroyer 123

            Oh, agreed sir

    • Immersive_Computing

      I would argue that Index is a second generation headset in terms of the ability to create a much stronger sense of presence, which is all I am interested in as a long time VR enthusiast since 1991.

      When customized properly for the individual’s fit and paired to a top end VR rig (to allow exploration of the 120/144hz modes and supersampling), it’s a breathtaking experience at 144hz and ultra low persistence -i’m using 8086K/2080Ti to exploit the Index’s potential.

      There are fitting issues out of the box for face and hands; the bizarre decision by Valve to only include a narrow face cushion – reducing optical clarity, stability and comfort for wider faces as the face cushion quickly degrades trying to accommodate the inherent asymmetry and leaving the user “chasing the sweet spot” with constant adjustment.

      As an ergonomist looking at craniofacial data and percentiles, this will be a problem for many, remember Vive shipped with narrow and wide cushions in the box. I’ve asked Valve who said no plans for other face cushions at the moment.

      I’ve been working on the ergonomics since launch; successfully using a prototype 3D printed wide face cushion, and 3D printed controller boosters which transform it even for medium sized hands giving a larger volume to grip placing fingers in correct orientation for buttons. Larger hands could benefit from larger boosters…
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/ff2b884f205a0eb61ac9456d12c690e6aa19efcbf253f9fc11ec95205b719dd8.jpg

      • Virtual Funkality

        I think the Index was what should have been released 3 years ago. The Pimax 5k+ is way more immersive for me than my Index. I can’t tell the difference between 90,120hz or 144hz. Maybe I am not sensitive to that sort of thing. The Index is front heavy, runs hot and in the end just wasn’t getting used so I sent out back. I need true wide FOV or else it’s a novelty… but that’s just me.

        • Immersive_Computing

          I haven’t had the pleasure of using an ultra wide FOV headset yet but have heard great things about the pimax, great to hear you are enjoying yours! I’d assume after using a Pimax or Star it would be difficult to go back, I got to try a Rift CV1 again last week and was shocked at the step backwards, it’s easy to forget.

    • Jimmy Ray

      Connect 6 will probably talk about Gen 2. Atleast I hope. FB has always said that the Rift S is Gen 1

    • Trenix

      You can’t even afford it, nor do you have the tech to make it a reality. These posts are getting childish real fast.

      • Virtual Funkality

        Obviously I can afford all the headsets but mainly they are used for work.

  • Ugur Ister

    I’m in Germany and i just received an email from Vive.com to inform about the preorder availability and it states 799 Euro as price.
    Many companies sell devices in Germany (in many parts of Europe really) for the same figure as in the US, just an Euro sign put next to that instead of the dollar sign.
    Which makes all those devices a good bit more expensive here, but then they argue with shipping costs, tax already included in there etc.
    But to charge 799 Euro for something which costs $ 699 is generally a bit steep and as price for this headset in particular, yeah, they are pushing it there. Bummer, was halfway interested in it.

    • asshat

      if you cant afford 100$ more for oversee logistics on a newly released product thats already 700 then you cant afford it and would most likely regret buying it eventually. So good choice!

      • Ugur Ister

        First: 799 Euro is $873, so the difference is bigger than $100 and second: no need to be so snarky. I’ve bought various gear before which was considerably more expensive, my laptop alone costs a lot more. That’s not the point for me, for me it is more a perceived value thing, and there it seems like the Vive Cosmos, at least to me, has a tougher time to justify a 799 Euro price (or $873) when at the same time something like the Rift S costs so massively less. The Index costs a good bit more for the total package, but that then also in return has more higher end features with the bigger fov, better speakers, another step forward on some ends controllers etc.
        The Cosmos to me seems to compete more against the Rift S, while we’ll have to see if the controller tracking etc works as good as that and how the overall experience is holding up in comparison to the other headsets.
        While i understand HTC can’t do as much loss leader business on hardware as Oculus could, yeah, i feel it is is justified to say they are pushing it with the european price there.
        It is fine for you to feel like the price is justified, doesn’t mean you have to talk others down like that who have a different view, which is quite plausible to have, too.
        HTC can choose to only sell to enthusiasts in Europe who don’t mind to pay the equivalent of $873 for the headset, but that group will for sure be considerably smaller than if it would cost 699 Euro or even go lower to a price closer to the Rift S, which costs 450 Euro here, which is around $490.
        You see what i mean? We’re talking about a price which gets too close to double of the most comparable competitor here for my liking.
        I’m still interested in the headset, that european price just made it slip from the “will buy close to launch” list to the “let’s wait and see about reviews and potential price drops later” list

        • The Bard

          He doesn’t want to see anything. Best Regards, Ugur Ister.

      • The Bard

        It is produced in China, the same distance to Europe as to US. The price should be 650 EUR, not 800 EUR.

  • gothicvillas

    No thanks lol. 110fov enough said.. losing tracking here and there. Wow. No.

    • Trenix

      Until graphics cards get far superior while remaining cheap, don’t expect that to change anytime soon.

  • iThinkMyCatIsAFlea

    Yay! Another one…

  • Anders Eismann

    So, basically reso boost and inside out tracking and thats it for that money? No thanks, i have already Index and this is amazing headest, im very happy wit that :)

    • Trenix

      And capable of outside in tracking, and phone support in the near future. It also has an extra camera when compared to the rift S. Therefore those who don’t want to have sensors cluttering and making their room ugly, don’t have to always deal with it.

  • Caven

    I’m not thrilled at all about the price, but the tip-up capability, support for the wireless adapter, and the optional SteamVR tracking plate are all useful features to me.

    For people who don’t care about those features, I agree that the Vive Cosmos is too expensive for a bump in resolution and better audio. In my case though, I don’t know of any other way to get all those features in the same headset.

    • MW

      It’s your money. Some people are buying Porshe to drive in the city. Good for them.
      But I’m regular guy and I will never recommend Cosmos to any of my friends or clients if something much so more cheaper can give them basically the same experience.

      • Trenix

        That’s not even remotely the same. It’s more like you’d prefer driving a car that is more likely to give you motion sickness, doesn’t go optimal speeds, and has foggy windows which is far worse for 30% of the population.

        • MW

          Yeah… About that – read next article ‘hands on’. Problems with tracking, old lenses. You have no chance to convince me.

          • Trenix

            Both Valve Index and Rift S had issues with tracking upon release. Also I haven’t found any solid evidence about Cosmos having old lenses. Even if so, the Vive never had a real issue with god rays. While they did exist, they weren’t noticeable.

            In all seriously I’m not here to defend Vive, but you clearly have a heavy bias or have some weird hate towards Vive. For me, this headset checks everything that I wanted from a headset. The original vive was the top premium headset for awhile so I’m expecting the cosmos to replace it. They have plenty of experience in enterprise headsets and have invest everything into VR, so I’m expecting them to do well.

            The Rift S has been a joke, something everyone was laughing at and been completely disappointed with. At least Oculus Quest was standalone, but Rift S was just a downgrade from the original. If you’re broke or short on money, be my guest. But it’s a waste in my opinion. As for Valve Index, the accessory is the price of a computer that is required to run it, that’s just stupid. It’s also not going to be customizable or capable of using a phone or using inside out tracking.

            Sorry but Cosmos is actually worth it’s price when it comes to all other headsets. If I was interested in Rift S, I would of bought it by now.

      • Caven

        Not sure where you’re going with the Porsche analogy. I was talking about features I’d actually use, not features that are only useful for bragging rights.

        In my case, I’m working on VR development, so I have to put on and remove a headset quite often. In iterative development, it’s not unusual to take off a headset for just a few seconds to make a quick change before jumping right back into VR. This can happen several times in a minute depending on what I’m working on, so tip-up functionality would avoid a lot of hassle during development.

        As for SteamVR tracking, I am also working with Vive trackers. I can’t get away from the need for Lighthouses, so the SteamVR plate gives me another option for a Lighthouse-compatible headset. Despite the alleged superiority of camera-based systems for ease of implementing tracking pucks, nobody actually does it.

        And finally, the wires for tethered headsets tend to be quite the annoyance for me. Because of the size and layout of my workspace, it can be hard to route cables without snagging on things, especially on headsets with shorter cables. Even if that weren’t a problem by itself, part of my use of Vive trackers is for motion capture, so faithfully capturing efforts to avoid tripping over the cable or getting wrapped in it isn’t ideal.

        I realize my use-case isn’t typical, and as I said before, I agree that the Vive Cosmos is too expensive for people who don’t need those specific features. For ordinary VR entertainment, I’ve been able to get by just fine without most of those features (though I still find wireless to be quite freeing). But for VR development, those are significant quality of life improvements.

  • Lucidfeuer

    Too little, too late.

    • Trenix

      You make it seem like everyone has already bought a VR headset yet. We’re all waiting for that one headset that will wow us. For me, this one has. The others are just a piece of junk.

  • The Bard

    To little, too late, for too much. Vive never learns. Silly management.

  • The Bard

    Cheap, flexible OLED panels available since at least 2-3 years. For VR headset no need to bend and twist that OLED screen. The manufacturer only needs to bend it slightly for 210 FOV and mount in headset. Of course, custom lens production too. This is not any big deal. But they still put smartphone LCDs inside VR and think we are dumb. I hope Samsung will soon finish off these silly companies and present 180-210 FOV, wireless/wired device like it patented in January 2019. It would be a total game changer and idiots like Vive and Facebook would need to follow the trend. I count on Samsung this Autumn. They already wrote/said several new VR devices will be released by Samsung:
    http://pdfaiw.uspto.gov/.aiw?Docid=20190026871

    • Trenix

      We’ll see.

  • Trenix

    Cosmos has a better resolution, extra camera for better tracking, higher refresh rate, capable of being used wireless, and will eventually support smartphones. I also believe it has a ipd adjustment nob. These are pretty big differences but I want to reveal how mentally retarded Rift fans are. Honestly I’m probably going to go with the Index anyway, but if I were to get a headset for inside out tracking, it would be this one over the rift any day. Facebook going to be out of the picture soon enough.

    • MW

      No. Those are ‘paper’ difrences for me. They don’t have barely any impact on real experience.
      Look how many people buying cheaper gpu. Yes, we have 2080ti for a year, but do you know which gpu is used the most in2019? 1060. Second is 1050ti.
      Difference in fps is not worth the money for average Joe.
      So, Sorry, but you are absolutely wrong.

      • Trenix

        All that truly matters and this is more of a premium headset. Get a cardboard instead if you’re more worried about price than experience.

        • Fabian

          I wish it was premium, I’d be happy to pay double the price for anything that is not as bad as any other headset on the market. But any price for zero progress is too much.

          • Trenix

            If you think there is no improvement despite there being clear improvements mentioned, then I can’t convince you otherwise. You’re just saying words with no meaning. “Not premium cause I said so, no improvements cause I said so”. I get it, you guys want high refresh rates, high resolutions, eye tracking, high fov, basically you want everything for a cheap price while you own a garbage computers, or have a computer that cannot support what you ask for anyway. At least be reasonable, because most of you VR fans are making a fool out of yourselves.

            The cosmos is the successor of the HTC Vive original. Specs prove it, improvements prove it, and even the developers stated that was what they were going for. If you don’t like what you’re getting in our time and age, than wait another decade. You’re not going to see VR replace computers anytime soon.

          • Fabian

            I’m not talking about improvements compared to the original Vive, a potato is better than. They compete with everyone on the marked and not just themselves no matter what they say. It’s obvious which improvements needs to be done, you named most of them because you know, so don’t blame me not stating the obvious. What you say about hardware and performance is nonsense:
            1) I do own a high end PC and if I need something faster I will buy it.
            2) Performance scales only with render resolution and not with display resolution. I am running my games already with 200-300% supersampling. With higher resolution screens I will just lower the supersampling and have the same performance.
            3) You also mentioned eye tracking, the reason why everyone wants this is because it enables foveated rendering which will solve performance issues.

          • Trenix

            “I’m not talking about improvements compared to the original Vive, a potato is better than.”

            Except the original Vive was the top premium VR headset in the market for quite some time before others began to compete.

            “It’s obvious which improvements needs to be done, you named most of them because you know.”

            I also know that everything you’re asking for isn’t a reality at this time. You’re asking for too much, not comprehending the expenses and technological limitations. It’s childish and unrealistic.

            “1) I do own a high end PC and if I need something faster I will buy it.”

            You don’t get it, you’re asking for a high-end computer that doesn’t exist, unless you’re going to fork over thousands for the newest graphics card and processor that is not meant for the general consumer. You want a cheap VR headset, but yet you want it to run at high-end specs. You get what you pay for.

            “2) Performance scales only with render resolution and not with display

            resolution. I am running my games already with 200-300% supersampling. With higher resolution screens I will just lower the supersampling and have the same performance.”

            Most of your VR games are running with low resolutions and low refresh rates. The vast majority of VR games have also a very low texture quality, despite having maxed out settings. Developers wont change this anytime soon, because VR headsets are extremely demanding when compared to a monitor.

            “3) You also mentioned eye tracking, the reason why everyone wants this is because it enables foveated rendering which will solve performance issues.”

            This tech is still being worked on. It will cost quite a bit in order for a VR headset to support it because they need to get their money back for investing into such technology. It’s a step forward, but not anytime soon. Keep dreaming.

          • Fabian

            I also know that everything you’re asking for isn’t a reality at this time. You’re asking for too much, not comprehending the expenses and technological limitations. It’s childish and unrealistic.

            ALL I want IS already a reality just not combined in one product.
            They are all good in one or two aspects and fail for the rest.

            Resolution: HP Reverb
            Eye tracking: Vive Pro Eye
            FOV: Pimax and to some extend Valve Index
            Wireless: Vive wireless adapter und TPCast
            Refresh Rates: Valve Index
            Tracking Inside out with many cams: Rift S + Cosmos
            Black levels/Colors: OLED devices like Odyssey(+), Vive(pro)

            you’re asking for a high-end computer that doesn’t exist

            A HMD combining all this would have worst case requirements equal to the HP Reverb, so no problem at all, I have no idea why you think it takes a NASA supercomputer for that. With different refresh rates to chose from like 80hz or 60 FPS reprojected to 120 minimum requirements are a lot lower. With foveated rendering working, again a lot lower.

            Most of your VR games are running with low resolutions and low refresh rates.

            All my games run at exactly 90hz because that’s a fixed value and not the same as rendered frames per second. Allmost all games render also 90FPS except those where I decide based on my personal preferences to accept 45FPS-reprojection in favour to higher supersampling (Fallout 4 and No Man’s Sky).
            I don’t know what you consider low as resolution but as I am only aiming for the resolution of the HP Reverb for now, over 200% of an Odyssey+ is not low.

            “This tech is still being worked on. It will cost quite a bit in order for a VR headset to support it because they need to get their money back for investing into such technology. It’s a step forward, but not anytime soon. Keep dreaming.”

            This is not rocket science, it’s just a camera looking at your eye and providing coordinates to some API and HTC needs to support it anyway because they are selling the Vive pro eye. It might take a few month for software to make good use of it but somewhere it needs to start. For foveated rendering to work there’s propably more work to be done in the 3D engines beeing used (Unreal, Unity,..) but that’s not the problem of the HMD manufacturer.

          • Trenix

            First of all, if a device like that were to be possible, it would of been made by now. You know why it doesn’t exist? Because it’s not possible. There is a reason why each device provides something that another doesn’t. It has everything to do with price and the target market. Pimax is working on 8k X which is being tested on GTX 1080Ti and it appears they’re going to require a GTX 1080TI SLI graphics card or something much higher, maybe even a graphics card that hasn’t even been released yet. Who are you going to sell your product to with something as extensive as that? They’re also using a 75 refresh rate but they’re aiming for 80.

            What about the cost? The 8k is already $800, just for the headset alone. Therefore the newer pimax will be way more expensive. It’s also not very durable as many have stated, most likely to offset costs. It also doesn’t have cameras, and man I can go on and on. Eye tracking is also expensive and adds to costs, that’s why Vive isn’t releasing it to consumers, but enterprises. You just don’t know what you’re talking about, give it a few years. Don’t expect a huge leap for VR anytime soon until people begin to transition over with VRs like the cosmos.

          • Fabian

            I’m not going to have this conversion any further. You repeat the same nonsense I already explained and all this “it’s not possible”-blah blah. You are just wrong, it’s as simple as that. I don’t know why you feel the urge to talk about all this, you lack the basic knowledge but dare to tell me I wouldn’t know what I’m talking about, that’s so ridiculous.

          • Trenix

            Yes, you’re so smart. You have the ideas that no one has thought of and companies are too dumb to make a reality. Yet you’re probably just some loser at Walmart who owns google cardboard and things he understands VR. I bet you’re the type of person who believes we’re so technologically advanced that we’re able to invent machines where the society can self sustain itself without working.

            You’re overestimating our capabilities, you’re a moron. Wouldn’t be surprised if you’re a geezer, because those are the only people who think that way. “Why can’t my iphone make me food?!?!”, yeah definitely you.

          • Fabian

            Well, compared to you, being smart is really easy. I studied computer sciences, I am a software developer, I am VR enthusiast from day one and you better STFU. Go back to school if it’s not too late and stop bothering people with your idiotic thesis.

          • Trenix

            Really? I’m a descendant of Albert Einstein. I was president when I was five. I have a doctrine in psychology. I taught an ape to name themselves Fabian on the comment section and say stupid shit. “I want an all in one VR with the price of a google cardboard! You can’t make it? Wow you’re all stupid, just add tech that is still being developed and have us use a graphics card to run it which isn’t even made yet! I’m a software designer!”

            What a retard. If what you’re saying is true, that is actually really sad. It’s great for me that you’re my competition, but it’s bad for humanity that people like you exist in positions which you shouldn’t. Bet you love unions, because with that mental retardation, you can bet no manager would want to keep you. Like me for example, if I saw you being this stupid as a literal business manager, you’d be collecting unemployment, lol.

          • Fabian

            Go away creep, it’s over.

          • Trenix

            -drops mic-

  • Thoemse

    When I backed the Pimax 8K/5K+ I thought this will keep me occupied until the next gen of the big players release their headset. This new generation is a big dissapointment to me. Yes the Pimax needs to be modded with the DAS to be comfortable and you need the basic lighthouse equipment but if you got all that and get it dialed in you get a top notch erxperience – from a small pretty unknown china startup.

    It shocks me that oculus, valve and HTC couldn’t come up with anything that is a real upgrade. And yes I know that all these three are a better plug and play experience for most. What they aren’t is actually better headsets for the enthusiast though.

    The only positive surprise is standalone Quest wich is uninteresting to me – but good for VR.