HTC is running a Vive Pro 2 bundle deal right now in the US that includes the Vive Wireless Adapter, which when purchased separately costs $350.

The deal lasts from now until August 30th, bringing the full bundle price to $1,400. On its own, Vive Pro 2 costs $800, which doesn’t include controllers or tracking base stations (or Vive Wireless Adapter).

Besides a VR-ready PC, the bundle includes everything you need to go wireless: Vive Pro 2 headset, wand-style controllers, SteamVR 2.0 tracking base stations, Vive Wireless Adapter, and all of the bits and bobs in between, like cables, power adapters, mounting kits, etc.

Check out the headset’s specs below:

Vive Pro 2 Specs

Resolution 2,448 x 2,448 (6.0MP) per-eye, LCD (2x)
Refresh Rate 90Hz, 120Hz
Lenses Dual-element Fresnel
Field-of-view 120° horizontal
Optical Adjustments IPD, eye-relief
IPD Adjustment Range 57–72mm
Connectors USB 3.0, DisplayPort 1.2, power
Cable Length 5m (breakout box)
Tracking SteamVR Tracking 1.0 or 2.0 (external beacons)
On-board cameras 2x RGB
Input Vive wand controllers, rechargable battery
Audio On-ear headphones, USB-C audio output
Microphone Dual microphone
Pass-through view Yes

Granted, Vive Pro 2 still isn’t the most economical way to get into VR, although if you’re looking for a well-balanced PC VR headset with a better than average display, Vive Pro 2 is a pretty good choice.

Before you buy though, make sure to check out our full review of Vive Pro 2 where we stack it up next to Valve Index and HP Reverb G2, SteamVR headsets that most PC VR users look to first. In short, Vive Pro 2 doesn’t have the FOV of Index, or the clarity of Reverb G2, but it’s comfortable, includes a good slate of ergonomic adjustments, and has pretty great audio, albeit on-ear and not off-ear.

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Still, it’s hard to argue with out-of-the-box wireless and the ability to readily bring either Vive or Tundra trackers into the mix—just the thing to launch your VRChat dance battles to the next level.

You can find the deal over on HTC’s website, which lasts from now until August 30th.

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Well before the first modern XR products hit the market, Scott recognized the potential of the technology and set out to understand and document its growth. He has been professionally reporting on the space for nearly a decade as Editor at Road to VR, authoring more than 3,500 articles on the topic. Scott brings that seasoned insight to his reporting from major industry events across the globe.
  • Ossi Hurme

    Probably still no update to the wireless that would support Pro 2 full refresh rate?

    • XRC

      Its not technically possible to support vp2 full resolution using wigig adapter. Would require wigig 2 but nothing happening there.

      • mirak

        The issue is probably more about the wireless adapter not supporting Display Stream Compression, which is needed for the Display Port link between the headset and the wireless adapter.

        You could just compress the image a bit more to fit wigig, which has way more bandwith than wifi, and that seems enough for Quest2.

    • MeowMix

      probably not. Vive’s wireless tech is licensed by them, it’s actually developed by a company called DisplayLink, and leverages Intel tech. Thus, licensing upon licensing. DisplayLink built it around the original Vive, so it’ll probably take DisplayLink updating the tech; which they probably have no interesting in doing since PCVR hardware sales are so low.

  • ViRGiN

    That’s seriously impressive for HTC – they achieved what Valve claimed to be solved problem in 2017 – and actually released the product.

    • NotMikeD

      OK you got me, this made me chuckle.

    • MeowMix

      Nope; HTC licenses the wireless tech from DisplayLink, which uses tech based on Intel. HTC and Valve still have yet to figure out an inhouse solution

      • ViRGiN

        Doesn’t matter, the product is out there, and have been for some years. It’s sold under HTC brand.

  • Mike

    Okay. Let me know when you fix the unacceptably-low binocular overlap.

    • Zantetsu

      Is that how they get 120 deg FoV? By sacrificing binocular overlap. I didn’t realize that. Sucky.

      • Mike

        Yep. That’s exactly what they did. It has the lowest binocular overlap of any major headset ever released.

  • Andrew Jakobs

    Even though it was almost as expensive back then as a Quest, it’s still the best investment I did for my Vive Pro (1). I was so annoyed by the cable, even with a kiwipulley system (which already is a great improvement over running the cable down your body/ground). Looking forward to upgrading my Pro to something newer like maybe the Quest 3, but still hate it that the newer headsets still don’t have the blacklevels as the Pro, but then again, no godrays and next to nothing SDE might offset that. Still wonder how wireless image of a Quest 2/Pico 4 compared (with VD) to the wireless image of the Pro.

    • ViRGiN

      You forgot to mention the awesome vive wands.

      • mirak

        yes they are great, and they don’t break

      • Andrew Jakobs

        Well, they are great controllers, more then enough I use them instead of the valve index controllers, but mostly that is due to the game having been designed with the wands in mind (and don’t want to deal with the reassigning buttons through the steam overlay).

        • ViRGiN

          What games were -designed- for wands?

          • Andrew Jakobs

            Games that came out before the index controllers were sold? Clearly as always you don’t use your head.

          • ViRGiN

            Ignorant troll alert!

          • CrusaderCaracal

            Why are you so petty lol

          • ViRGiN

            Also – food for thought – you made over 10k comments, and barely got 6k upvotes. Looks like nobody cares about what you have to say. Touch some grass. Sell your Vive.

          • Andrew Jakobs

            well you’ve only had 2.4k comments and barely got 1.2k upvotes.. So what’s the f-ing point you’re trying to make? You really are the biggest troll around here.

          • ViRGiN

            Ignorant troll alert!!

          • ViRGiN

            Just balancing out your downvote-before-reading approach to everything.
            If I’m a troll, then you’re actively enganging with a troll. Which in turn makes you extremely pathethic. Keep up the good work chap.

          • Andrew Jakobs

            oh wow, talking about down-voting… You’re the one that downvotes everything and everyone always.. And I noticed you down-voting all my comments so after a while I just started doing the same because you deserve to be down-voted due to all your toxic posts.

          • ViRGiN

            Ignorant troll alert!!!

        • Zantetsu

          I’m not sure what the troll you are responding to said since I blocked that poster. However I agree that the Vive wands can be useful input devices. People who get personally offended that other people have a different preference are laughably small minded and quite frankly stupid.

          A lot of older games just don’t work very well with Index controllers, even with button re-assigning, which itself is usually an intense pain. So breaking out and using the Vive wands is a fine way to quickly and easily have a good experience playing the game.

          Also the Index controllers in my opinion are not the end-all be-all anyway. I find them generally uncomfortable, and pretty fidgety with so many individual controller elements crammed into a small space. In my opinion the Oculus controllers are the best of all, but really there’s no controller that is a “pleasure” to use, it all comes down to which one gets in the way the least most of the time.

          And the Vive wands can be a fine choice depending on the game, the experience, and personal preference.

          • Andrew Jakobs

            Yeah, you’re absolutely right. But for the lighthouse system there are no ‘touch’ controllers available, and the standalone Quest Pro controllers are a bit too expensive, I’m not even sure SteamVR supports them separately from the Quest Pro headset.
            But I agree completely with people having different tastes for different controllers. And it all depends on the gameplay which controller might be more suited to your liking.

      • CrusaderCaracal

        Yeah i love feeling like i’m a wizard when i play games

    • LazyFox

      I have both a Vive Pro /w wireless adapter and a Quest 2.

      I noticed a slightly higher resolution + higher latency in the Quest 2.
      The Vive Pro handles dark scenes better, and looks less compressed, though the degree to which compression is noticeable varies by the scene.
      The Vive Pro can also be used with Valve Index controllers, which are better than any other system I’ve tried.

      I usually end up preferring the advantages that the Vive Pro has (especially the latency) over the resolution advantage that the Quest 2 has.

  • david vincent

    The Pico Neo3 Link is just 3x less expensive and offers better controllers and the best Fresnel lenses on the market (best clarity and almost no glare).
    In wireless mode, 10bit 120hz look already pretty good and when I need the best visuals, the best performance or even the basic industry standard for VR latency (<20ms), I switch to DP mode.

    • Zantetsu

      Pico Neo3 has 98 degree FoV though, which unfortunately, if that spec is important to you (and it’s very important to me), is not competitive with the Vive Pro 2.

      I am intriuged by the “best Fresnel lenses on the market” aspect though. I hate Fresnel lenses with their glare and poor colors, I’d be interested to see how good the Pico’s are.

      • david vincent

        The poor colors issue doesn’t come mainly from the LCD screens?
        If found the Fresnel glare very minimal in my Pico Link. And the sweet spot is large, the edge to edge clarity is good (which compensates for its slightly lower resolution compared to Reverb G2 for exemple).
        watch?v=iA_2VbQwnHg

        The main issue with the Pico Link is the narrowed face gasket made for small asian faces. So you have to replace it.
        /r/PicoXR/comments/12wvofy/pico_neo_3_link_users_highly_recommend_replacing/

        • Zantetsu

          If you’ve ever used glass lenses (like in the DK2 and I believe original Sony PSVR) you’ll know what I mean. Unbelievable color fidelity. Other lenses reduce contrast and color saturation, including Fresnels. I don’t doubt that Pico Link’s are the best Fresnels (I’ll take your word for it!) but, fundamentally, it’s still Fresnel.

          And yes, LCD also reduces contrast and colors.

          Large sweet spot and edge to edge clarity sounds awesome!

          • david vincent

            I must admit I had been more impressed by the vivid colors of my CV1 than by the color fidelity of my DK2.
            I know even the use of pancake lenses can lead to colourimetry problems if the screen is not bright enough (the Pico 4 has this serious issue).

  • Lucidfeuer

    Horrendous as always

  • Wild Dog

    They must be getting self conscious about how out of touch they are, to be bundling their ancient overpriced wireless adapter with it.

  • Bubba

    It doesnt mention the resolution is limted to barely better than vive pro 1 resolution when using the wireless adapter on the vive pro 2

  • CrusaderCaracal

    Obviously shows how Vive sales have been doing recently. Yiikes