NVIDIA Announces GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, 2080, and 2070, Starting at $500

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After months of rumors, NVIDIA’s latest gaming-focused GPUs have been revealed. Today the company took the wraps off the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, 2080, and 2070. Starting at $500, the cards are set to begin shipping in September.

The GeForce RTX cards are based on what NVIDIA calls its new ‘Turing’ architecture, which is built to accelerate real-time ray-tracing operations to bring more realistic lighting and shading to games.

The GeForce RTX GPU lineup follows a familiar hierarchy to the prior 10-series cards:

GeForce GPU Ray Tracing Performance* Memory Starting At Founders Edition
RTX 2080 Ti 10 GigaRays/sec 78T RTX-OPS 11GB $1,000 $1,200
RTX 2080 8 GigaRays/sec 60T RTX-OPS 8GB $700 $800
RTX 2070 6 GigaRays/sec 45T RTX-OPS 8GB $500 $600

All of the GeForce RTX cards also offer hardware support for the VirtualLink VR connector, which is designed for the next generation of VR headsets. It appears that all of NVIDIA’s ‘Founder’s Edition’ GPUs will include the USB-C based port alongside DisplayPort and HDMI ports. The company’s professionally-focused Quadro RTX cards were also recently announced with support for the VirtualLink connector.

Image courtesy NVIDIA

NVIDIA says the GeForce RTX GPUs feature “New and enhanced technologies to improve performance of VR applications,” including “Variable Rate Shading, Multi-View Rendering and VRWorks Audio.” We’ll be looking forward to getting our hands on the new cards to see how they fare with VR rendering specifically.

SEE ALSO
Watch NVIDIA's Gamescom GeForce Event Live Here, Today @ 9AM PT
Image courtesy NVIDIA

Pre-orders for the GeForce RTX Founder’s Edition cards from NVIDIA are available starting today (links in the chart above), with the 2080 Ti and 2080 expected to ship starting on September 20th, while the 2070 release date hasn’t been announced just yet.

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  • Xron

    Totally unreasonable prices for a tech that might be implented in more than few games by 2019 or even 2020 when their next gen of cards will come by -.- and no mention of Vr is dissapointing too, during pascal presentation they actually mentioned Vr, and now they did not -.-
    Yes they have Virtual link but I didnt hear any real info about it ;/

    • Get Schwifty!

      Yeah well VR is in a lull publicly… their site does however indicate in a panel set of features VR, so it’s far from forgotten. As for prices vs. performance, it is a huge increase in power even above ray tracing (which is pretty amazing)…. enough to do much more 1440P high end gaming which even 1080 Ti’s struggle, and for the bold, 4K is much more palatable with higher frame rates. I believe I read about some demo they did of a game with 40 FPS at full settings in 4K vs 78 with a 2080 Ti…. about a 95% increase in speed…. food for thought, and not sure but this might impact some streamers as well but that is a unique case.

      • Xron

        They mentioned about it during presentation, but I think that demo was tinkered with their new AI algorythm that gave new 2080Ti such an advantage.
        Hope that gtx 2060 will be enough for next gen Vr headsets…
        As for me, I will wait for 3080 or 3080ti, by 2020, because I think that Oculus will release their new Hmd 2020 aswell.

        • Get Schwifty!

          Possibly, but I can almost guarantee you that 130% at a minimum is possible… if so, then people desiring the best stable frame rates at 1440p and 4K will snap these up…. to say they are not worth the investment for two years or so is absurd….

          • MosBen

            Unless I’m really misreading the May 2018 Steam Hardware survey, only about 3% of users have 1440p resolution primary displays, and only 1% have 4k displays. That seems pretty niche to me. And even for those niche gamers, a 4k display can be had these days for far less than these graphics cards cost, so it’s not at all a sure thing that those people will snap these new cards up at those prices.

            And I don’t think that I said that I would recommend holding off for 2 years, though I don’t really think that that would be a bad idea. But I think that it probably does make sense to hold off until you can get some kind of deal on them, probably closer to a year from now.

          • Get Schwifty!

            Tell you what MosBen, you get back with me in 3 months and lets see how the sales of those 2080-series cards do…. regardless of what you consider “niche”, there are more people who own 1440p and 4K systems than Steam shows, as that is just a partial listing and quite honestly the more intelligent folks typically don’t allow steam to pull stats. I don’t mean that to sound elitist, but its generally true, so I suspect that number is actually about double at least, but its the front end of the next wave. Shit, I still recall when people thought 1040×768 was all we would ever need….. so, yes there was a time when 1080p was “niche” by that logic…

          • MosBen

            Even if we assume that it’s double, at least, you’re still talking about less than 10%. That’s a niche crowd. And there was absolutely a time when 1080p was niche. And over time the price of hardware to render and display software at 1080p dropped in price to the point where it became mainstream. Right now 4k is still fairly niche, and if you limit it to PC gaming, it’s very niche. Eventually that will change, but with $500-$1000 graphics cards, it won’t change super fast.

          • Do ya know if its truly a bit of a boost. Would have to see soon.those w/o 10 series cards can buy these and it would be worth it.

      • MosBen

        I’m actually super pleased that these are being released now. I’ve never understood why people pay full price for graphics cards. At least with a new console there are games at launch that were created with the console in mind. With a PC graphics card, sure, you’ll get a bit of a performance boost, but no games are really going to take advantage of these cards for another year, at least. And probably around that time we’ll get some price drops on these cards as well as the likely introduction of the 2050 and 2060 cards to round out the gpu generation with some affordable cards.

        And that leads me to why I’m glad that these are coming out now. We don’t know when the next generation of HMDs are going to be released, but we can be reasonably certain that it won’t be for a year or so. So by the time new HMDs are coming out, this generation of gpus should finally be getting affordable, and there’s a decent possibility that at least some VR software will actually take advantage of the features of these cards.

        • Get Schwifty!

          ” I’ve never understood why people pay full price for graphics cards”…..”With a PC graphics card, sure, you’ll get a bit of a performance boost, but no games are really going to take advantage of these cards for another year, ”

          I think you need to reconsider those comments based on a lot of people’s experiences… First, even the *best* 1080 Ti card cannot maintain stable 60+ frame rates, or what is now considered high end gamer levels of 100+ frame rates, even at 1080p in some cases with existing games, much less 1440p and 4K for many games at their absolute highest settings, and between the time a games comes out after a card, or even around the time, the games on PCs are actually _ahead_ of what most hardware can do at the highest levels. These new cards are probably around +150% or more of last generation 1080 series, so are in effect “Catching up”. Prices are high thanks to miners, but that doesn’t deter gamers, and the reality is prices will likely never come down, much like gas is now permanently up, so to get the most processing use out of a card for cost, it makes a LOT of sense to buy them when they come out.

          • MosBen

            I kind of feel like that’s what I said, a new card will give some performance increase, but the actual new features of the card, like ray tracing or a new VR port, won’t be used for a significant amount of time. And in the mean time we’re talking about between $500-$1,200 in order to take a very decent fps and make it into a very high fps.

            As for prices, they simply have to come down. Not only is that just how tech works over time, but a robust PC gaming culture simply won’t remain robust with cards this expensive. And specifically regarding VR, no VR HMD that hopes to attract mainstream acceptance is going to require the additional purchase of a $500-$1,000 video card.

            And while I don’t begrudge someone with money to blow blowing it on a cutting edge video card, your justification for why it actually makes sense to buy them when they just come out, doesn’t make any sense. Waiting to buy a new graphics card doesn’t mean that you’re going to get any less processing use out of a graphics card, and given the strong likelihood that the prices will come down at some point, the processing units per cost will be a better bargain at a lower up front cost.

          • Get Schwifty!

            I think there is a greater case for these cards than “a bit of performance”….

            Also, good luck on prices coming down, all these will do is drop prices now for the 10-series cards to be honest.

            As for VR, unless we see signficant changes in HMD resolution (which we aren’t even with Vive Pro) at 1080 Ti handles it just fine.

            You get the most processing “oomph” by getting a card in the beginning vs. the software that can best utilize at that point in time. That is the best I can do to explain it to you. Your value on tech *always* decreases the later you buy it from introduction.

          • MosBen

            Well, right. The release of these new cards will result in a drop in price for the older series of cards.

            And I think that you’re using a very peculiar definition of “value”. Value includes both the improvements that the new hardware represents over the old hardware, how many applications/software need that upgrade in order to enable a good user experience, and the cost. If a piece of hardware goes up in price after its introduction, then sure, you’d get the best “value” by having purchased when the card was released. But outside of those months when miners broke the graphics card market, that’s not typically what happens. Similarly, there are certainly some games that really will benefit from the horsepower of these new cards, but the majority of games are just fine on the 10 generation of cards, and the added horsepower is a marginal improvement in some niche use cases. It will represent a much better value in a year, when more people are likely to be using 4k monitors, more games take advantage of the card’s features, and the price may have dropped a bit.

          • Get Schwifty!

            Again, there are many prosumer games who would vehemently disagree that 10-series cards are there outside of 1080p gaming, and as 1440p is the new average standard, with 4K on board, the two-year old 10-series is showing its age…. I would disagree that 1440p and 4K are “niche” any longer, that was two years ago…

          • Dave

            MosBen A hardcore gamer doesn’t need justification to buy an expensive graphics card. But if you want one, then sure it’s to get better FPS, higher resolution and more refresh. I’m not sure price comes into it if I’m honest.

          • MosBen

            I completely believe that it is the case that some subset of gamers want higher numbers at any cost. I just think that that’s kind of a ridiculous waste of money. Obviously, it’s their money to burn. I just don’t think that it’s a great investment in terms of what you get at launch for the price.

          • Dave

            Oh definately!! I have to admit though I love VR, I’ve only a GTX 1070 at the moment which runs fine, but I’ll probably end up being one of the idiots to forks out the cash for a 2080 just so existing experiences can be a little better and I’m ‘covered’ for the next gen when it arrives…

          • MosBen

            I’ve got a 1070 as well, and couldn’t be more pleased with my purchase, which was back in Spaing 2017. It runs all of the flat games that I want and does a great job in VR. I recently picked up a 13″ Dell Laptop and have been thinking about dropping my 1070 into an external enclosure in order to get rid of the desktop entirely.

            Obviously, at some point I’ll have to upgrade, but I think that buying a new and super expensive part to future proof your machine almost never works out as a good value. I think that the better bet is to wait a year or so until the next generation of VR headsets are announced and we find out exactly what kind of power they’ll require for a good experience. I actually have a strong suspicion that the system requirements for the next generation isn’t going to go up a ton because everyone making HMDs wants them to be affordable to the biggest group of people possible, and that’s not going to be the case if they require a computer with a $500+ graphics card. That said, if I do decide to upgrade when the next round of HMDs comes out, I’ll probably be able to get a decent deal on a 2000 range card.

          • Doctor Bambi

            “As for prices, they simply have to come down.”
            I don’t know if I just had bad timing or am not enough of a bargain hunter, but I remember being excited for the release of the 10 series cards, expecting a drop in price to the 9 series, only to discover they did not drop in price. Doing research at the time I learned that when Nvidia makes a new series card, they essentially stop production of the old models altogether, and I guess there are enough idiots out there to buy up the remaining product at full price.
            And as for GPU prices dropping over time… I paid $440 for my MSI 1070 basically as soon as it was available, just went to go check the price now on Newegg, $390. So it’s dropped $50 over the last 2 years… that’s a long time to wait for a pretty minor price savings, and then it’s a 2 year old piece of tech that’s already failing to meet recommended spec on some games! It seems like GPUs exist in a weird bubble when it comes to pricing. If you want to spend less on a graphics card, that’s what the x50/x60 level cards are for, as you’ll generally still benefit from core architecture advancements and maintain compatibility for the largest amount of time.

          • MosBen

            I mean, like I said elsewhere, I’m not suggesting that people wait two years, but I got my 1070 a bit over a year ago at Best Buy, and there was some kind of deal so that I remember not paying full retail price.

            And how can a 1070 not meet the minimum specs for games when the new line of cards was just announced? Until literally yesterday it was Nvidia’s 3rd most powerful consumer card.

          • Doctor Bambi

            You got me there bud, some of these recently released VR titles have shockingly high requirements, either a 1070 is the min spec (L.A. Noire, Fallout 4 VR, ect.) or in the case of Hellblade, doesn’t even meet min spec! That being said, it is totally a VR specific problem, and doesn’t really reflect PC gaming as a whole. It’s still a very solid card for just about everything PC gaming has to offer atm.

          • MosBen

            I wasn’t aware of Hellblade’s requirements. That’s bonkers. That said, while I could almost, sorta kinda justify $500 for a graphics card upgrade, the more expensive cards seem like unnecessary, especially since 1) we don’t actually know what their performance compared to the 10 series is like, and 2) the number of games that will take advantage of the biggest feature of this generation of cards, ray tracing, is going to be extremely small for quite a long time. Implementing ray tracing is going to take significant work to be implemented into the popular game engines, and then it’s going to take significant work at the developer level. It just doesn’t seem like something that’s really going to pay off for 6-12 months, if not longer.

            A 1070 will do 90% of what someone would want to do today, and will continue to be a very competent card for a good long while. Long enough, at least, that we’ll be able to see what the system requirements are going to be like for the next generation of HMDs, and wait for some kind of price cuts or deals on the 20 series of cards.

          • Doctor Bambi

            Yeah, there’s still plenty of unknowns about these cards, hopefully once the 3rd party benchmarks get in and the other manufactures announce their variations things will be more clear.
            I’m not entirely convinced the ray-tracing capabilities are there yet for these RTX level cards. They can show all the pretty CG rendered videos they want, but until we see an actual game running with ray-tracing it remains an ambiguous feature.

      • HybridEnergy

        What are you talking about?! I do 4k on my 1080 ti easy Witcher 3 , Deus Ex mankind Divided, everything recently released. 60 fps

      • DJHeroMasta

        Actually, the 1080 Ti ran that demo at 30fps :D THE GTX Titan X was required to achieve 60fps during that demo.

      • Zerofool

        The comparison was at 4K using their new DLSS – a feature that runs AI inferencing on the tensor cores. Pascal doesn’t have any of these, so it does the work inefficiently on the CUDA cores. In short – comparing apples to oranges.
        Not once in the presentation did they show any actual 10-to-20-series comparison in traditional (non-RTX features) games. I don’t remember seeing such a thing on any of the previous series announcements. A bit sketchy, don’t you think? I fear that the improvements may not be that big in traditional rasterization games (which include VR), and they are using the hype to milk the fanbase by only saying “oh yeah, it sure is faster than Pascal in traditional games, believe us. But we’re not showing benchmarks today, wait for proper reviews… but until then, go online and preorder the card” and then dangling shiny things in front of their faces (literally).
        It’s entirely possible that RTX2070 will be within 10% the perf of GTX1080 (while being similarly priced), 2080 within 10% the perf of 1080 Ti (while being similarly priced), and 2080 Ti will be ~25-30% faster than 1080 Ti, i.e. close to Titan V’s gaming perf (while priced as a Titan-class card; the MSRP is $999 but you can’t find a single model under $1150). Not really the jump I was hoping for, considering more than two years passed since Pascal’s launch (and almost nine months since Volta).
        I think that buying a product without seeing a single thorough independent review is unwise at the least, especially at these price levels.

    • Darban

      Usually when they don’t mention features, it means it’s lacking and unimpressive. I have a feeling VR won’t be as big for this series. RIP 2 years of virtual computing.

    • HybridEnergy

      Agreed, the cords seem fucking slow, they can shove ray tracing up their ass, I want to super sampling up the ying yang first.

      • Get Schwifty!

        How do you figure they “seem slow”…l mean, unless I missed something what evidence do you have? Volta is pretty acknowledged to be a significant jump in architecture and bandwidth…. which gives you supersampling….

        • HybridEnergy

          There is nothing to me that screams Raw Power. It’s got a slower core clock and the same amount of memory.

          • Get Schwifty!

            I suspect changes in the architecture will provide some of the “raw power”, but in truth we will have to wait and see what benchmarks show. If Nvidia were so absurd as to produce $1000+ cards to compete with their existing cards, and provide say +10% speed then they have truly lost their minds which is simply not the business savy Nvidia we all know…. as the old stock will maintain most of it’s value on the market and the new will not move. To my knowledge this has never really happened with a major Nvidia release, I suspect the Ti will exceed it’s old 1080 Ti by about +25% on up to +35% on average, possibly more as features such as ML contribute a bit.

          • HybridEnergy

            True, but at the same time they now safely have a borderline monopoly on gaming cards. AMD is barely in the game anymore. This makes companies act different. To me, a 25-35 % generation gap is no longer satisfactory, it was back on flat screen gaming when you just wanted to go from high to ultra settings in Crysis. I was kind of hoping for a leap I guess.

        • Javed Asghar

          Dude its funny to see you write.
          You just have to comment even when you dont know a thing.
          let me prove it here,
          it is based on “Turing” architecture not volta.
          It is slow.
          It is slow because of the ray tracing cores.
          there is a reason fps or perf increase was not discussed.
          You were wrong to another guy claiming 130% extra grunt for a 2060. You really need to study videocardz and its excellent engineer commentators on some articles to understand how this is literally behind even current gen or at best on par for VR. apart from the connector, eveything already existed in pascal.

      • Dave

        LOL You don’t know anything about how it’s put together. This number is lower so it’s not better is the dumbiest dumb answer I’ve ever witnessed.

        • HybridEnergy

          Dumbiest dumb ? lol ok, yea all we have is numbers on paper to make us question and debate the potential of the cards so what do you want.

          • Dave

            LOL Sorry I feel bad saying that. I was thinking of iRobot. Lets hope 4K games runs ok in most cases and supersampling of 2.5 in VR will be the norm with the 2080 GTX…

    • Dave

      Did I miss something “New and enhanced technologies to improve performance of VR applications,” including “Variable Rate Shading, Multi-View Rendering
      and VRWorks Audio.” and VirtualLink – seems like plenty to me to get excited about…

      • Jerald Doerr

        People just don’t understand… Nvidia could have explained stuff instead of yelling and jumping around for 60 min… And the other 20 min actually showing crap.

    • dk
  • Get Schwifty!

    Congrats…. still on the fence myself, with my monitor I can at best do 120 Hz – UWD, Gsync, 3440×1440 not sure outside of the ray tracing how much of a bump it would really be…. right now floating on around 90 for my main FPS (Overwatch)…. still, running a _flat_ 120 Hz would be nice

    • David Herrington

      While you may not need an RTX for current games, I’m guessing future games will likely start using ray tracing more often and make these almost a requirement.

      • Get Schwifty!

        I would disagree partially — my current main games (Fallout 4 still, Overwatch) both humble a 1080 ti to less than a consistent 90 fps settings at 1440p, sometimes even less than 60 fps. As 4K is becoming the next standard coming on, these cards have tremendous value. Only people playing at 1080 ti levels have no need for the moment.

      • DJHeroMasta

        They already are the requirement lol. The 10xx can’t preform Ray Tracing at playable frame rates. Hell, the next Gen VR HMDs won’t even work with last Gen GPUs due to thier connection method. Type C.

    • Get Schwifty!

      Well, I didn’t sit on the fence too long, I pre-ordered, given Amazon’s policy of not charging until shipment I have some time to make a final decision….

      • DJHeroMasta

        Fluff that. Just get the FE edition. I can’t stand blower cards. When they throttle, that’s performance you’re missing out on. Especially if you HAVE to get a blower card. Nah, man…..There are Mid Size cases that have tempered glass side panels with more than adequate airflow for $50-$60 on Newegg (That aren’t shit Phanteks and Raidmax make some quality $60 cases. In fact, they’re sold out right now). Unless you’ve got some HTPC rig or something of the sorts.

        • R FC

          Pricing is interesting, I paid £1099 for my Founders Edition 2080Ti.

          I am seeing pricing on overclockers with UK pricing on AIB cards and they are typically £1199-1399 for MSI, Asus, Zotac, etc.

  • Jan Ciger

    The problem is that pretty much *none* of the current games or popular game engines (Unity, Unreal, etc.) use real time raytracing for rendering. And that’s not a simple change to make. Then it will take time until some games actually come out that use that technology from the updated engines.

    And there I am talking about “flat” not VR content. Who knows how well (or not) will this stuff actually perform in VR and how long will it take for the drivers and applications to obtain somewhat decent performance.

    So buying this at these prices when there is literally nothing on the market that can use it is a bit crazy, IMO.

    Maybe next year when the OEMs catch up, the prices go down and there will be some real-world data about how it actually performs and which content can actually benefit from it.

    Of course, for people who always have to have the shiniest and newest for bragging rights and have a lot of money to throw out of the window this won’t matter.

    • R FC

      Nvidia’s presentation focused on hybrid use of RTX technology alongside current rasterisation rendering, with ray tracing used for dynamic lighting, shadow, global illumination; rather than replacing raster rendering with ray tracing? https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a5a58cf28c293344f6941a40f506cbadbd34d2aaa4ae174dcdcce16af1cf686d.jpg

    • Daniel Pramel

      Battlefield 5 will use it and both of the big engines will support it rather soon.

      • HybridEnergy

        BF5 is a pancake game. We spit on those here you heretics. lol

    • Get Schwifty!

      I would compare it to when the first Voodoo cards arrived… NO games outside of like two that shipped with them used the tech… within two years EVERY game that was 3D used the cards…. we already have Battlefield V with it, and at least one more… what I hear here are a lot of rationalizations for not buying one and that is fine, the same type of comments about sitting on 960’s was the case when the 1080’s came out… you’ll know by mid October how these new cards stack up. The memory bandwidth on the Ti alone is +27%, factoring in architectural refinements under Volta and I suspect the outlier bump is going to be +40%, the average probably as usual around +25% base speed.

  • FireAndTheVoid

    “In Death” will be one of the first games to receive RTX (ray tracing) support. It was visible on a slide during the keynote.

    • HybridEnergy

      I got bored of that game months ago, not sure shiny objects are gonna help.

  • yuppfail

    I cant find where to buy it… i guess i spend my grand somewhere else lol

    • Michael Slesinski

      you didnt read the article then.

      • yuppfail

        oh snap i didnt see that bracket saying those were the links to the shop. but you know thanks for criticizing me over reading absolutely 100% of an article instead of just saying thats where theyre at. You must be nie in person.

        • yuppfail

          nice

        • Michael Slesinski

          if you cant be assed to read the article you commented on what are the odds that you would read a comment about your comment? by all means though go “spend your grand” on switch games or something mr. high roller…

          • Daemonic

            lol

  • Michael Slesinski

    finally! time to upgrade.

  • HybridEnergy

    I don’t get it. The GPU core is slower , other than the 3gb/s mem speed what’s faster ? ray tracing doesn’t mean shit for another few years so whatever to that number.

    • Get Schwifty!

      The memory bandwidth is +27%…. and with Volta architecture better than Pascal, that is why i is faster… are you guys new to GPUs by chance?

      • HybridEnergy

        Well, on my 1080 Ti the mem bandwidth doesn’t seem to be stressed all that much when I log me playing. Even on afterburner graphs. It’s the core clock that is sitting at max all the time.

    • dk

      they r saying hey look 1080ti is a pretty good deal now

  • Jerald Doerr

    I’ll wait for EVGAs version of the 2080TI and pic up 2…

    • Get Schwifty!

      When is it due?

      • Jerald Doerr

        Not sure… Last time after the 1080 came out it was around 2 months.

  • The future of high-end GPU sales relies entirely on VR. Nvidia’s path is clear: $600 VR card for the big-boys, and $250 (or less) mid-range GPU for the new comers… and then upsell them on the $600 after VR hooks them.

    You can “get-by” with 20 or 30 fps sometimes and not sweat it. But when you lose frames in VR, it hurts your brain. Most people have been getting by on less and less expensive GPU’s, even down to just the Intel Graphics. Most PC gamers I know now have low-end cards, just because they’ve gotten so beefy. I know at least 4 or 5 people who would love to get into VR, and $400 for an Oculus set does not deter them, but $600 for a new video card too, $1000 total(!!!), that’s the end of it for them. This is a HUGE market to drive discrete GPU’s again, VR is their pride and joy!

    What I’m wondering is where is the FOV rendering? Are they hoping to make up the future power deficit of VR HMD’s by just raw power alone? Are they skipping FOV rendering just so they can sell us more and more power cards? Even if they are that greedy, they are also VERY short sighted, as it’ll take several generations (at 50% average gain a year) to handle 4k and 8k HMD’s that should be here by the end of next year. They’ll kill their own demand by failing to meet current needs, forming yet another nasty speed bump to VR adoption.

  • Gary

    I wonder if AMD like what they did with the threadripper to Intel, can one up NVIDIA’s 2080 series at a cheaper price. It’d be amazing. Hopefully these can do 4K at 144hz

    • Zerofool

      AMD had to make a choice and focus its resources only in one area – they chose their CPUs. And now this decision pays off – next year will be huge for AMD, especially in the server market, intel will loose a significant market share. Once they start getting serious money thanks to Zen, they could fund a comeback in the GPU arena, but it will take time. The results of this effort will most likely materialize in 2020 at the earliest, but they will also need to worry about Intel and their discrete GPUs which are expected the same year…
      Unfortunately, I don’t think AMD will have an answer to 1080 Ti for quite some time, not to mention 2080 Ti or functionality like DXR :/

      • Get Schwifty!

        I’d love to believe that is true…. the cult of AMD never gives up, but I am glad they exist to help push Nvidia and Intel, otherwise we’d be sitting on 2008 tech still…. the big potential player is Intel who is getting into discrete graphics cards…. AMD has a serious uphill battle between both points coming…

        • Zerofool

          >> I’d love to believe that is true
          Which part exactly? Taking share from intel? It’s happening already in the desktop market – take a look at the monthly sales numbers of the last two years provided by mindfactory.de
          The margin on these parts is nowhere near the ones of intel’s products, so the really lucrative market is the server/datacenter space. The Zen-based EPYC chips were a great start, but all 1st gen parts are a sort of trial run for the tech – nobody serious in that space jumps on board on 1st gen products. The second gen EPYC, codenamed “Rome” is based on Zen2 arch (not Zen or Zen+), it’s built on 7nm and will feature cores-per-CCX jump from 4 to 6 or 8 -> cores per die from 8 to 12 or 16 -> cores per socket from 32 to 48 or 64. And best of all – it’s drop-in compatible with 1st gen EPYC servers. Intel has nothing on their roadmap to counter this. Even their CEO said on the record that they’ll lose 15-20% enterprise market share to AMD next year. I think that’s a conservative estimation, actually.
          But even if we leave the servers alone, the 2019 Zen2-based Ryzen processors will finally come close enough to the mainstream intel lineup, so much that differences in games will be negligible, and possibly even surpass them (with the current Zen+, it’s within ~5-7% @1080p, and lower at higher res). So yeah…
          How this success in the CPU business will affect their GPU products in the future is a mystery for now. Navi is not the answer to Volta/Turing, the current info suggests that it’s a primarily console-oriented part (PS5, XB w/e), with perf-per-watt as main goal, basically a Polaris successor of sorts.

          >> the cult of AMD never gives up
          There are many cults, but I’m a member of the fair competition cult ;)
          FYI, the last AMD CPU I had was a Sempron 2800+, and the last GPU was a HD5850 which I chose over the contemporary Nvidia cards (GTX 500 series) only because of the Bitcoin mining rush of 2011 (and I’m glad I did).

  • Mythos88

    If there was example of why capitalism need competition this is yet. It took this long for NVidia to release a marginal upgrade at double the price of last gen. I’m really starting to dislike NVidia.

  • Lucidfeuer

    Not impressed, waiting for GPU-rendering benchmarks. Also too expensive, but once the wave of dumb couch potatos have bought it, prices will have to go down for the professional markets.

    • Get Schwifty!

      Dude, come on… your in the business… you are _never_ impressed…

      • Lucidfeuer

        Yes they were. And that’s why prices keep hiking. That’s also why we need an economical krash.

        • JJ

          are you high? you’re logic is that you wish Nvidia would fail as a company so that you can get their stuff cheaper…. yeah that makes soooo much fucking economical sense im just bursting with economy!!!

          • Lucidfeuer

            You have the stooge syndrome. This cancerous attitude is the reason why technology is stalling and prices inflating. You don’t even know how economics and -competition- works…

          • MosBen

            I don’t often agree with Lucidfeuer, and I certainly don’t agree with everything that he said in this thread, but yeah, people who bought video cards for gaming during the recent shortage caused by the crypto miners made a mistake. Prices were inflated due to over demand, but it was always going to come back down eventually. People who bought got ripped off, and by buying at inflated prices they just encouraged higher prices.

  • Ci Dev

    I made that mistake!. You should probably wait until these cards are reviewed and benchmarked. I built a $1500 Z370 rig (without a discrete GPU) for VR in anticipation for the new gen cards. So other than looking pretty, it’s been losing value and getting obsolete by the day for the last 3 months. It’s going to take at least two years before you can actually leverage the RTX bells and whistles (updated game engines, new HMDs with virtual link, …). So my last hope is a significant increase in raw performance to justify that price tag.

    • R FC

      I’ve been waiting since last April (2017) to build a new PC, and planned to wait until the next generation of Nvidia GPU was released; there was no point in buying back into the previous generation.

      I have no doubt that the 2080Ti will be more powerful than 1080Ti by looking at the technical specifications:-

      -Cuda cores 4352 versus. 3584
      -Clock speed 1635 versus. 1582
      -Memory speed 14 Gbs versus. 11 Gbs
      -Memory bandwidth. 616 GB/s versus. 484 GB/s

      Then of course you have Tensor cores on RTX ;)

      • Ci Dev

        I pulled the trigger on an MSI 1080Ti Duke for $660 (after $20 rebate) before they run out of stock. There is something fishy about these RTX cards, so I made my bid. That leaves me with $300 to pre-order the HTC vive wireless module. I like it when things add up :). Again use cases are differents for everyone. Mine is to leverage the crap out of my HTC vive for the next 2 years. Other than street fighter, I don’t play any pancake games.

  • dk

    how about 20 bucks

    • Jistuce

      I’d buy that for a dollar!

      • dk

        finally …my fake money is worth something :P

  • MW

    500usd?? LOL. In eu near 1200 USD for 2800 (2700 does not have vlink). In those prices Vr is dead. Ridiculous.