VRgluv has blown past its $100,000 funding goal in 56 hours on their Kickstarter page, with 27 days still to go. The product is described as the “first affordable force feedback gloves” that feature “total hand tracking, full force feedback, and pressure sensitivity”.

Update (4/28/17, 12:39PM PT): VRGluv has now exceeded its $100,000 Kickstarter goal, presently just over $113,000. The company has announced in an update a $250,000 stretch goal which will add a replaceable battery to the glove. The company has also opened a new $370 pricing tier limited to 400 backers.

Original Article (4/27/17): Going live on March 31st, VRgluv’s website revealed their haptic gloves, compatible with both HTC Vive and Oculus Rift hardware, said to be comfortable, functional, and affordable (despite looking rather clunky). An appealing $300 price point (relatively speaking) for the Super Early Bird is the likely reason for the rapid influx of early backers and, being limited to 100 backers, is already sold out. The next tier at $350 is limited to 200 sets, followed by a ‘Kickstarter special’ price at $400, with the final retail price expected to be $580.

VRgluv Kickstarter

As shown in the Kickstarter video, different adapters allow for Oculus Touch controllers, HTC Vive controllers or Vive Trackers to clip to the sides of the gloves to perform the spatial tracking duties, with the gloves containing proprietary technology to determine finger positions and grip strength. Ideally, Vive Trackers would be used—being the least-bulky attachment to what is already a chunky pair of gloves—although VRgluv describes the units as ‘lightweight’, and the adapters are said to be carefully designed to hold each tracking solution in the most balanced position.

Applying haptic glove support to VR applications involves incorporating the VRgluv SDK, and the team recently created a short video to showcase a few examples of games already compatible.

VRgluv is one of several devices in development that provide a haptic feedback solution for hand interaction in VR. Others include the EXOS, the Dexmo exoskeleton, the temperature-changing Senso and PowerClaw, the Gloveone and Avatar VR from NeuroDigital Technologies, and more. As the haptics challenge is being approached from so many different angles, it’s difficult to predict if one product will rise to the top; this area of VR development is likely to remain experimental and niche, although VRgluv’s price is impressive considering the low volume, wireless technology, rechargeable batteries, and the likely high number of mechanical components involved.

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VRgluv is aiming to deliver the first sets to customers in December 2017.

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  • Nairobi

    Jesus Christ that thing looks bulky as fuck. Well, it’s a step in the right direction.

    • Yeah you definitely look a bit like Batman wearing them…still though, I’d be interested in the experience they give for sure

      • Nairobi

        Nah this is something Batman would wear to PROTECT his gauntlets. That’s how bulky it looks.

    • It has mechanics that stop your fingers moving, hence the bulk.

    • It has mechanics that stop your fingers moving, hence the bulk.

  • Firestorm185

    Anyone else think they look like slightly bulkier versions of Adam Jensen’s hands? At least that’s the feels I’m gettin’. XD

  • Lucidfeuer

    The design is nice, too bulky of course, but it’s a shame it relies on external sensors like Touchs or Pans that adds to the bulk especially if you’re not using them. Surely the lighthouses and towers would be capable of tracking IR mark-ups with the adapted software update.

    “Force feedback” as in physical reconstruction of object is killer for these gloves, but I’m not sure what kind of haptic feedback model this uses (gun recoil, balloon popping, micro-vibration, object texture etc…the Vive pans or Switch Joycon do that well).

    • steven

      they claim to use some sort of mechanism to restrict the forward motion of the fingers, so I think we can rule out vibration motors.

      • Lucidfeuer

        Both are not mutually exclusive. That’s kind of disappointing, although it’s great they could put mechanical design for physical emulation of object in a nice though bulky design.

    • Sponge Bob

      The design is DOA
      gloves should be tracked to headset. period.

      • Lucidfeuer

        I know what you mean, but it’s irrelevant, there’s not even one headset integrating inside-out tracking, let alone any LeapMo/Nimble hand-tracking like component.

        The worst is that you really know how much money-hungry, unperceptive and lazy Oculus got, given how logical it was to integrate inside-out wireless tracking and hand-tracking back then, so much that they bought 13thlab who had a solution working with 6 y.o. external cam solution and NimbleBit which was a low-latency hand-tracking solution…then both got vaporwared, and we got these going nowhere already archaïc VR prototype sold has consumer VR HMD that sold less than the Virtual Boy 25 years ago or even the Wii U in their first year…

        Anyway, these glove, are for now the best you can do, except for that ridiculous tracking system.

      • Lucidfeuer

        I know what you mean, but it’s irrelevant, there’s not even one headset integrating inside-out tracking, let alone any LeapMo/Nimble hand-tracking like component.

        The worst is that you really know how much money-hungry, unperceptive and lazy Oculus got, given how logical it was to integrate inside-out wireless tracking and hand-tracking back then, so much that they bought 13thlab who had a solution working with 6 y.o. external cam solution and NimbleBit which was a low-latency hand-tracking solution…then both got vaporwared, and we got these going nowhere already archaïc VR prototype sold has consumer VR HMD that sold less than the Virtual Boy 25 years ago or even the Wii U in their first year…

        Anyway, these glove, are for now the best you can do, except for that ridiculous tracking system.

    • Sponge Bob

      The design is DOA
      gloves should be tracked to headset. period.

  • Miqa

    This only proves that it is very easy to fool consumers. This is DOA from a consumer perspective. $579 is prohibitively expensive, assuming that they actually make it work. The adoption rates will be very low, nobody will develop for it.

    Then we have the very fierce competition in the VR-glove space.

    It is sad really. These companies should try to seek proper funding instead of tricking consumers with false promises. I’m sure it can be an amazing product, but it is too expensive to work for consumers. They should target public venues like IMAX instead, because this is where it will end up if it actually succeeds.

    I wouldn’t back it. At best you get a functioning product, at a small discount, that you will have one amazing experience with, and then put on your shelf.

    • Surykaty

      VR is already democratized now let’s stop trying to get it socialized. Such a VR glove with force feedback involves a lot of electronics, motors, encoders and relatively expensive mechanical parts. It is by nature a PRO accessory and so it will carry a PRO pricetag. There is absolutely a market for more expensive and great working VR gadgets so let’s not get carried away just because most consumers won’t want to buy it because of the price.

      • Hartmut

        totally agree! This is for Business applications, for industry applications the price is very reasonable. We backed it and can’t wait to play with it and create experiences for it.

      • Miqa

        I’m not sure whether you agree it disagree. I don’t oppose to the existance of such devices, just the way they are funded.

        There will be lots of consumers that will back this expecting to be able to use it at home in their livingroom. That won’t be the case as the software won’t be there.

        • Surykaty

          What are you talking about?????????????????????

          If you pledge 349$ you are expecting a working unit in YOUR living room! (163 backers and limited to 200)

          If you pledge 399 you also get a pair (unit)…if you pledge 799 you expect 2 working units…

          Dear Miqa, I don’t think you know how Kickstarter works and how this campaign for these glove was set up. These are developer kits and I don’t see anyone claiming a very quick entrance to the basic consumer level VR market here and very quick entrance to the games (software). You are getting borderline irrational on this issue. Maybe a few deep breaths will help you.

          If you are already past implementing the Vive and Oculus controlers in the game and the SDK is good enough, implementing a basic pickup system where the user can feel the force feedback from the object he’s picking up (glove stops fingers on the collision points with the object) is a matter of few minutes to few hours.

          • Miqa

            They are not promoting it as a developer kit, but a final product. You’d probably do yourself a favor and actually read what they claim.

            It wouldn’t be easy to just add to your preexisting game. This would require substantially more regardless of your status with Touch/Vive. Like material behavior, realistic physics simulation, deformation of objects, more than one way to grab objects etc.

            I’m well aware of how Kickstarter works and its shortcomings, that’s why I wrote it in the first place.

            It’s obvious that we disagree on the subject and I’m not gonna engage in some kind of internet brawl, so I’ll refrain from posting further on the subject.

          • Sponge Bob

            no sane developer will develop for this

      • DC

        For business applications, VR arcades, and the enthusiast market, I’m sure it will do just fine. Who cares how its funded if people get to use it who want to use it. It’s so early days, people gotta figure out what works and what’s clunky. This seems like a solid venture in that respect. Nobody should expect anything more from these things at this point.

      • Brent

        it will be less expensive when more versions are released!!

    • Sponge Bob

      true
      they should develop fully integrated tech product, not some hack with vive controllers
      kickstarter never works for true technology development – just not enough money if any at all
      its only good for advertizing

    • Sponge Bob

      true
      they should develop fully integrated tech product, not some hack with vive controllers
      kickstarter never works for true technology development – just not enough money if any at all
      its only good for advertizing

  • AndyP

    I got carried away in Robo Recall when it first came out, didn’t notice the guardian wall, punch a picture, broke the glass, cut my hand (now that’s immersion!) – it could get quite expensive with these!

  • steven

    A lot of negativity here… sounds like everyone wants haptic gloves but nobody is willing to support any of the up-and-comers. Sure they’re a bit bulky, but at least they exist. If their technology works how they say it does, I’m sure the size could be reduced on the next version.

  • Joe Bazaar

    Road to VR, please ask if you can review the gloves (try them on) so that they do not get away with ripping everyone off

  • Sponge Bob

    Don’t want to be negative.. but… attaching Vive tracker or Touch to VR glove is just .. idiotic and completely unworkable
    Not to mention the cost
    Plus.. who really wants to wear those big ugly gloves ?
    isn’t wearing big ugly headset enough of inconvenience ?

  • M Rob

    This is a fake product. They took the Kickstarter money and ran.