Last month HP announced that it was releasing a new Reverb G2 headset with some tweaks designed to improve field-of-view and controller coverage. We got out hands on the new headset and put it through the paces.

Reverb G2 is a decent headset and in our review we really loved the clarity of its display and lenses, but were a bit let down by the limited field-of-view. And even though the headset had notably better tracking coverage compared to prior Windows VR headsets, it still had some blind spots that were easy to notice during regular use.

Now HP has released a slightly updated version of the headset in the US which hopes to specifically address these issues, along with improving compatibility with AMD GPUs. We got our hands on the new Reverb G2 and compared it to the original.

HP is still calling the new version of the headset the ‘Reverb G2’, but for clarity let’s call the original the G2 and the new version the G2.1.

Eye-relief & Field-of-view

Photo by Road to VR

The Reverb G2.1 comes with a new facepad which can be reduced from the original fixed eye-relief distance of 15mm to 9mm. This is accomplished with a simple spacer which comes pre-installed in the G2.1. In my experience with the original G2, there was a good deal of field-of-view left on the table because of the fixed eye-relief. In theory, removing the spacer to drop down to 9mm should help people like me get closer to the headsets maximum field-of-view.

Indeed, removing the spacer brought a noticeable improvement in both vertical and horizontal field-of-view. Here’s a look at measurements comparing the field-of-view of the G2 and the G2.1.

Reverb G2 vs. G2.1 Field-of-View – Personal Measurements
(no glasses, measured with TestHMD 1.2)

Horizontal FOV Vertical FOV
Original Reverb G2 Eye-relief (15mm) 82° 78°
Reverb G2.1 Eye-relief (9mm) 98° 88°
Absolute Minimum Eye-relief (facepad removed) 98° 88°

You can see that using the 9mm setting on Reverb G2.1 increased my horizontal and vertical field-of-view by 16° and 10° respectively.

Compared to running the same field-of-view test with the facepad completely removed, I got the very same results (because at that point the screen becomes the limiting factor over eye-relief). That means that the 9mm setting of the Reverb G2.1 allows me to perfectly maximize the headset’s field-of-view.

Now I want to be clear… this might not be the case for everyone using the headset; it depends entirely on the topology of one’s face. Some people may already be getting the maximum field-of-view (or close to it) at 15mm, and going down to 9mm would only serve to reveal the edges of the display instead of expanding the field-of-view.

As for me, the 9mm setting was just right in that it maximized the headset’s field-of-view without revealing the edges of the display—which is generally preferred because the hard boundary of a display is somehow more immersion-breaking than the soft boundary of a lens.

Photo by Road to VR

There’s really only one downside to this change and that’s a slightly smaller nose cavity, no matter if you’re using the spacer or not. If you have a big nose and the original G2 feels tight there, the G2.1 could put bothersome pressure on your nose.

The spacer itself is such a simple part and I’m really glad HP went out of its way to include it in the new version of the headset to make it easier for everyone to dial in the eye-relief to get the most from the field-of-view.

The spacer of the Reverb G2.1 perfectly fits the headset’s shape | Photo by Road to VR

The spacer is perfectly formed to the headset and snaps onto its magnetic attachment points, and then the facepad snaps over top of it using the same magnets.

If you’re curious, yes you can use the new spacer and/or the new facepad with the original Reverb G2; both will fit perfectly onto the headset (you can also use the old facepad with the new headset). However, using the new spacer with the original facepad (which would take you to a 21mm eye-relief) sort of works, but the two parts lack a perfect seal which causes some light leakage that can be annoying.

Continue on Page 2: Tacking Coverage »

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  • VRFriend

    Fools redesigned that gasket to not fit ideally to the original model with flaws? What?

    • Eraserhead360

      Not sure what you mean.

      “If you’re curious, yes you can use the new spacer and/or the new facepad with the original Reverb G2; both will fit perfectly onto the headset”

      The spacer doesn’t fit perfectly on the original gasket. But why would anyone want to do that?

      • Good to know. A little late for me since I purchased 3D fabricated frame, but at least it will help others.

    • ViRGiN

      That’s the definition of “no compromise” that they used in their marketing lol

  • Lhorkan

    Thanks for the review! A comparison with the Index’s (and other) HMD FOVs would be nice here as well.

    • benz145

      https://www.roadtovr.com/htc-vive-pro-2-review/

      My measurements for Vive Pro 2 gave me 102° horizontal and 78° vertical. Theoretical maximum for the headset is H117° and V97°.

      Vive Pro 2 might indeed have a 120° horizontal field-of-view, but only if you could get your eyes close enough to the lenses. Although the headset has an eye-relief adjustment, it doesn’t seem to have the range of motion necessary to maximize the field-of-view, at least for my head. The eye-relief adjustment on Valve Index, on the other hand, makes it easier to squeeze the most out of the headset’s displays.

  • silvaring
    • Zantetsu

      Those tiny lenses scream “very small FOV”.

      • silvaring

        90 degrees apparently.

        • Arturs Gerskovics

          small then

          • polysix

            Same as quest 2 but bigger than quest 2 vertically. So no not ‘small’ more like ‘standard in 2021’.

      • Toto_Dot

        And your post screams “Clueless”.

        • ViRGiN

          Your post screams “i have put 5000 hours into elite dangerous/msoft flight simulator/project cars” or other hardcore simulator that is forever niche, and you project that onto everyone else.

    • But is it an actual VR headset with 6DoF and matching controllers, or is it really just a glorified display and you need to have some other device plus buy additional controllers and the like? And what are all the specs?

      • Jeff Axline
        • Andrew Jakobs

          So it IS just a glorified display… big fail.

          • Jeff Axline

            I would never buy this but it’s a nice peek at what’s just around the corner for larger headset makers.

          • Andrew Jakobs

            But not at the expense of FOV which ‘we’ already want larger than the current batch out there (except ofcourse Pimax headsets which already have an amazing large FOV but still need some fixing in regard to artifacts).

          • polysix

            FOV is the last thing to address. Without STUNNING blacks, SUPER CLEAR lenses, HIGH resolution, GREAT tracking, WIRELESS… you have an issue getting even many VR fans to actually use VR.

            FOV is the ‘holy grail’ of the visual side of VR but it has to come later, much later, or it brings too many compromises (pimax always show the jank and now the high costs). FOV will come in time, for now clarity and resolution/display quality to actually LOOK real (BLACK blacks, no screen door, no god rays, light, comfy etc) are all far more important or it’s just another tech toy/dev kit waiting to be dead a year later.

          • ViRGiN

            Games are the holy grail, when those are available, then hardware makes sense. Stop jerking off to your personal use case projecting onto entire population.

          • silvaring

            Not current games though, a VR mod on existing AAA franchises will not do the trick. Its definitely part of the plan thats needed though. What we really need is all these fancy new NVME drives and AI assisted graphics techniques to make photo realistic graphics in virtual reality and seamless transitions between photo realistic environments (or ‘games’ if you will)

          • Andrew Jakobs

            mwa, I think the resolution is already pretty solid, tracking is already pretty solid, ok I also want clear lenses, and well, black I can’t comment on as I still have a HTC Vive Pro which has OLED panels. But I’d rather have a larger FOV now than even more higher resolutions.
            I guess people have different idea’s about what VR needs to have to actually use it.
            So for me the only need now is:
            -much bigger FOV
            -Clear lenses
            -at least the same black/fidelity in colors as my Vive Pro (better is always good)
            But I must agree with ViRGiN this time, more AAA Games is actually what’s needed. Like FarCry 6 having a VR mode, or the coming Red Dead Redemption remaster, a Assassin’s creed in VR, and the list goes on and on.. Hell I would even love to see Alien Isolation VR mode actually finished for current headsets (and not needing a mod which still hasn’t proper motion controller support, as I understand).

          • Ace of Spadеs

            I want higher resolution, FOV is rather not important for me.
            And i want better lenses, preferably like the ones in PSVR, they the best so far and nothing beats them.
            And I want Micro OLED, at least 3K by 3K per eye as minimum, but ill take 4K by 4K
            I cant play games with how the low resolution is on quest 2, its blurry and like soap

          • Andrew Jakobs

            Oh please, the Quest 2 is far from blurry. But higher resolution with not being able to get a GPU to drive those for affordable prices makes me not want that for the time being. Some people should really stop being such snobs and be realistic. If you have the cash to spend, go ahead, spend it on $3000+ headsets. But don’t think you’ll get it any time soon for $500..

          • Ace of Spadеs

            Resolution shouldn’t be that expensive, there are screens in the market available, look how fast it went from Quest 2 to G2 to VIVE Pro 2, vive almost touches 3k by 3k
            And arpala uses new screens, its Chinese no name brand, so that means such screens are available and they not arm and leg price
            If Facebook wanted they could get ANY screen for low price, due to their brand name and how many units they buy, any screen factory will make them a screen to order, if tomorrow they ask for 4K by 4K micro OLED, LG and Samsung [and otehrs] will be competing who makes the screen first for best price.

            I had PSVR on PS4 pro and I liked the lenses more then what I got later in PC VR
            Then I moved to Rift S, i unboxed it, played 10 minutes and boxed, later i sold it, HORRIBLE Resolution, unusable for my taste.
            I have ques t2, on 3090, with all settings maxed and when i play games its like looking through Vaseline, its far from being sharp
            My main PC monitor is 55inch OLED C9, i use as daily monitor and gaming screen, it does 4K/120 so going from that to Quest 2 is like going back in time.

            Im not gamer first, im Hardware geek first and gamer second.
            There are people that dont care about that, they even play switch, i have hacked switch, i played maybe 10 games, each for 3-10 minutes and forgotten about it, its horrible.

          • Dave

            Yes this is pretty much my reply to Sebastian Ang. You have to admire the form factor and pancake micro oled lenses though but the rest is meh. Hopefully more manufactures adopt the pancake micro oled lenses. I do wonder if this has come from JDI and was the rumoured u-turn from LED’s?

          • silvaring

            Some Micro OLED news from earlier this year, including Apples ‘secret’ deal with TSMC for its micro OLED display, probably a high refresh rate custom display? https://www.gizmochina.com/2021/02/11/boe-microoled-display-h2-2021/

          • Dave

            It’s only a fail from a consumer perspective but from a technology it’s pointing the way. I also understand a version compatible with steam lighthouses is also in the works. The FoV looks small though.

          • Ace of Spadеs

            This is the product you want:
            https://www.arparaland.com/pages/arparaaio

            I want it too, its Apara+Quest 2, same chipset even, just 5K, has inside out tracking and so on

          • Andrew Jakobs

            But still not available, and as I understand, it’s 5K resolution is at 30hz only.. The Headset only version is $599 without any 6DOF tracking or controllers, and no real reviews yet.
            It is a step in the right direction though, but I wonder when it would really release the standalone version and at what price? Also if it would support SteamVR streaming like the Quest 2 does, because that’s just a must for any new standalone headset.

    • Graham Parker

      5K at 30hz… keep a bucket on hand to vomit into. At 1920 x 1920 it’s at 60hz.

      I wouldn’t trust anything from that company based on how they advertise 5K and up to 120hz together, but fail to list what the possible combinations are.

      • Anyone remember the PiMax 4K? I do and when I took it apart tI found they had sanded off the part number to their HDMI-LVDS chip (not quite though under UV) and found it to be a lower cost Toshiba chip that could never do the 4K at 60Hz, let alone at 70 Hz or 90 Hz like they claimed, or I should say like this company “up to 120Hz” which might technically be correct if you are happy with 1.2K per eye resolution.

        • Graham Parker

          Interesting! I understand sanding the models off chips isn’t uncommon (meant to slow competition from being able to copy them apparently) but that’s pretty suspicious yeah!

          • It was and I brought it up an number of times back then. It left a bad taste in my mouth about Pimax claims with their 8K HMD, that many seem to bear out as time went on as well.

            Sadly, we see a lot of exaggerated claims in this field, which has done more to dampen enthusiasm. Say what you will about Oculus, but it does pretty much what it claims to do, and at a hard to beat the price. Which is sad, because I want to see REAL competition in this area. Here’s hoping in 2022

          • silvaring

            I know a lot of you guys are enthusiasts and enjoy tinkering with early access devices, but on my side as a PC and console gamer I try avoid using hardware or software that isn’t reasonably mature or from a big company that has products available without being on some waiting list, or push significant software updates quickly (like what Microsoft did with the WMR tracking vs. when it originally released).

            Privacy is another issue, but in this regard I hardly see a difference between Pimax and Facebook both companies are super shady.

    • Sebastian is talking about this on his channel during his unboxing. I for one feel a deja vu to the Pimax 4K with this. Lots of claims, but little real world hands on reviews. Sadly Sebastian was a little over enthusiastic about it, and was vague on FOV and framerate, mentioning “it should do 90 Hz” with a different cable. At $599, I will hold on to the money until next year.

  • James Lopez

    How can one tell when ordering if they are buying the new version or old one?

    Also those FOV numbers seem odd as G2 was already reported as having a 98 degree horizontal FOV a year ago https://www.reddit.com/r/Vive/comments/i34yzd/fov_comparison_hp_reverb_g2_vs_all_other_vr/

    • benz145

      HP says all new orders (direct from them) in the US are the new version, but it’s less clear how one could be sure its the new version if ordering from a retailer like Amazon.

      As I explained, everyone’s head is a different shape. These figures are based on my measurements:

      Now I want to be clear… this might not be the case for everyone using the headset; it depends entirely on the topology of one’s face. Some people may already be getting the maximum field-of-view (or close to it) at 15mm, and going down to 9mm would only serve to reveal the edges of the display instead of expanding the field-of-view.

      As for Sebastian’s figures, he recorded a 114° vertical FOV which significantly exceeds the G2’s theoretical maximum (based on rendering) of 91°, so I’m not sure those numbers are reliable.

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      • Ace of Spadеs

        what about EU?

        • benz145

          So far they’ve only said the new version will be available in the US.

  • Zantetsu

    Why doesn’t headset setup include specifying eye relief to the rendering software? Given that the eye position relative to the display has changed, it seems like the rendering needs to take that into account in order to render the scene correctly, doesn’t it? Because aren’t you also making everything in the world look “closer” at the same time as you move your eye closer to the screen? So now objects that were supposed to look like they were 1 meter tall at 10 meters distance now look like they are 1 meter tall at 9 meters distance don’t they?

    • Good point, but I have never noticed that much shift in size as my eyes become closer. And frankly, at least for me, my eyes can only approximate size and only based on other objects in the scene. More of a problem is your eyes adjusting to being closer to the screen, especially as you get older.

    • benz145

      This is an interesting question. I asked some sources and they said eye-relief shouldn’t have much of an impact on scale given the way the optics work (image is projected fairly fair out in front of you, so moving a few mm closer isn’t actually moving appreciably closer to the image). IPD however can noticeably impact scale because it fundamentally changes your sense of stereo (how much you need to rotate your eyes to converge on an object at a specific distance).

      • Zantetsu

        Thank you for this informative reply. It makes sense now that you explain it!

  • Pablo C

    Will they be selling the new face adaptor for the ones that got stuck with the G2?

  • Roger Bentley

    can u compare the new gasket with the one you can get from vr cover which i have that is the slim pad with increased FOV to the new version. And does HP have a step up program for this.

  • Dave

    I love the original G2 and use it a lot. One of the issues for my trying solutions to increase FoV was that the headset isn’t great for my small head. Trying thinner facepads like the ones from VR covers makes the headset loose. The G2.1 headset I imagine will be the same at 15mm and loose again at 9mm. I certainly hope they can address this issue for the G3 headset.

  • gssjr

    Can you guys reach out and ask HP when the new face gaskets will be purchasable stand alone so I can use on my original Reverb G2?

  • wheeler

    Has there been any change to edge to edge clarity or pupil swim? I found both of those to be very poor in the G2 and it is the main reason I sent it back.

    • Toto_Dot

      It’s fine. Get your eyes checked.

      • wheeler

        It’s really not good enough for me. The Index is much better in both areas (so if I can notice its flaws vs other higher fidelity headsets, clearly it’s not an issue with my eyes) and the Q2 is about half way between the G2 and Index. The distortion actually made me feel rather ill and lack of edge clarity meant I was significantly less immersed. OTOH, it has better central clarity and less glare.

      • ViRGiN

        Yo, are you MRTV? Cause you’re clearly shilling.
        Get your eyes checked.

    • polysix

      I pre’d a G2 also (cancelled after first early reviews hit), but turned out to be as janky as HTC stuff but with ‘higher res’. Great… another sub par stop gap. You were right to return it and ignore this pathetic version 2. There’s far more on the near horizon now that we do NOT need to tolerate anymore the issues with the G2 and HTC’s crap.

    • benz145

      What do you mean by pupil swim?

      Edge-to-edge clarity is unchanged.

      • ViRGiN

        You sound like pimax, where all issues are experienced by a promile of users, and because they are wearing it wrong.

      • Ace of Spadеs

        In virtual reality, ‘pupil swim’ refers to an image-distorting effect
        that sometimes occurs when a user moves his or her eye around the lens of a VR headset.

      • wheeler

        By pupil swim, on a perceptual level I just mean “swimmy” optics.

        But I guess technically it’s a kind of distortion. All VR headsets technically suffer from it because, without eyetracking and corresponding adjustments in rendering, modern VR headsets can’t actually provide a correct image when your eyes aren’t pointing/facing directly forward. Oliver Kreylos explains it with a diagram here: https://youtu.be/iJ0TV2jgNoc?t=937

        The error as depicted in the demonstration is observed in headset as a sort of distortion or shifting/”swimminess” of the image. It’s especially noticeable when you keep your eyes fixed on an object and rotate your head (very common occurrence–one’s eyes are always locking onto things) or keep your head fixed and move your eyes smoothly (not common, this is a very difficult thing to do). I’ve found it’s more noticeable when you’re looking at a flat surface directly in front of you (e.g. a virtual desktop display, a textured wall) or a distant vista. The result of that distortion is discomfort/fatigue and ruined immersion, but it should be noted that not everyone is affected to the same degree or even conscious of the effect whatsoever. E.g. in the following reddit post Alan Yates talks about different levels of perceptual sensitivity and how it can affect people on an almost subconscious level: https://old.reddit.com/r/Vive/comments/8ea207/psa_alan_yates_on_the_gearvr_lens_mod/dxzkm5o/

        However, certain headsets have distortions of this sort that are much worse than others. In my experience, the Index and Vive are by far the best here, and the Rift CV1 and G2 are pretty bad. (note that I still see it in e.g. the Index, it’s just not as extreme). But if “swimminess” is a given in all modern VR headsets and yet in some headsets it’s significantly worse than others, then I guess this demands that one ask if the “additional swimminess” you see with certain headsets is adequately described by “pupil swim” and not some other kind of distortion. (given that, without eyetracking and dynamic rendering corrections, pupil swim would always imply some baseline level of distortion). That I’m not sure about, I just see certain hardware engineers claim certain headsets have “worse pupil swim” than others and I can corroborate that through my own experience. More recently, I think I’ve seen Valve use “geometric stability” as a catch all term, which is perhaps a better and more encompassing term.

        • benz145

          Yup, just wanted to make sure we were on the same page. I’ve never noticed much pupil swim in the original G2, nor did it stick out to me in G2.1.

  • Zamb

    Fk Europe then, I guess? And the rest of the world for that matter.

  • polysix

    Things move FAST in VR. G2 – the one time ‘best thing ever’ was a disappointment (I pre-ordered then cancelled after the reviews of its jankiness), it’s hard to get excited by this kinda format/build vs all the new stuff coming out or due out next year. G3 is needed but it must fix ALL issues and over-deliver (micro oled, pancake lenses and… PROPER tracking). I can’t see them doing it, HP are the new HTC… so near yet so so far.

    It’ll come down to Meta, Sony and Valve. All the rest is jank on the outskirts/underground of VR that’ll never get tracktion.

    • VRFriend

      G2 is great. Using it since December 2020. Never had any problem with tracking. You have lost time.

      • Shane Monroe

        You must not play Beat Saber. The game is completely broken on the G2. IMHO of course,

        • A.Sid

          You know you can use the G2 with Index Controllers and base stations right? With the current sale of $450, its less than an index headset alone. And the cost of G2 headset (at current discount) + 2 base stations 2.0 + Index controllers, is still $980, that’s $20 less than the Index for significantly better resolution, and the same great same tracking and sound quality. Its also more comfortable because its significantly lighter. Only things the Index has over G2 is higher FOV and better mic. This changes when its back to $600, but at the moment, its a good deal bc I don’t see the Index getting discounted, just not the way Valve rolls, especially because they always have backorders and their manufacturing capacity can’t meet demand.

          • Shane Monroe

            I did know that. My research (at the time) said I needed CFW flashed bluetooth dongles to pull that off. At that point, I threw my hands up and headed for zee hills (well, to Index).

            Is that still the case? I’m not a fan of WMR either.

            The visuals WERE impressive, though. Just need to be “the right person”, I think, to pull that sort of rig setup.

          • A.Sid

            lol. I understand that feeling.
            Unfortunately, yes, you need 2 specific bluetooth dongles. I haven’t done the process yet myself, but if you YouTube “HOW TO USE THE HP REVERB G2 WITH INDEX CONTROLLERS” you will find the process explained very simply. It seems very doable to me.

            I already have a bluetooth valve dongle from my Steam Controller, so I’ll just need another one, by purchasing a vive tracker for instance. Then you calibrate them and it looks like the process is easy enough, and it seems you don’t need to repeat it once done. Only problem is you need to leave those dongles in there so that’s two USB spaces in the motherboard, but for me that’s fine.

          • A.Sid

            In my case I had a Vive (OG 2016), and bought a G2, sold the Vive wands (which I liked a lot in retrospect despite the weight and size), headset and cable, but I kept the base stations which I plan to use in the future with Index controllers + they are attached to a false ceiling and their adaptors are up there inside the false ceiling so, it’ll be a process getting them out anyway. The problem I’m running into is that where I live Index controllers are super expensive ($500+) and I just can’t justify that, and wherever I or someone else travels, they are on backorder in that place. But I’ll figure out a way hopefully soon.

          • Shane Monroe

            My path was OG Rift to Quest to G2 to Index. I heard the Vive wands kick ass for Beat Saber … I’ve been jealous of those.

            TOTALLY dig where you’re coming from on not moving from those base stations. My Index ones are “mounted” but nothing so crazy I couldn’t pop them down and move’em if needed.

            Aside from the “issues” of drift/analog sticks (I haven’t had the issues yet – but it seems almost inevitable) the Index Knuckle controllers are the best feeling EVER to me. Feel like gloves instead of controllers. I aftermarketed the HELL out of my Quest controllers to make them comfortable, but I don’t think I could change controllers at this point. Knuckles FTW. $500+ is some goofy money though. I totally get your situation.

          • Shane Monroe

            Yeah, I watched that very video. Not “impossible”, but I was so frustrated at the end of my G2 experience I wanted out. :)

            What’s funny? I have a G2 headset still .. it was a replacement HP sent but never asked for back. No headphones, no controllers or anything – but …

        • A.Sid

          btw I played Beat Saber on the G2 and its fine. The tracking is really good when you are doing movements. Where its sucks is when you try to hold the controllers close to each other (a normal thing to do when holding a gun in HL: Alyx), when holding something really close to your face in a game, or when keeping motionless for a while above or below the waist. For me, I’m used to holding it down below the waist is more common when navigating menus. The new versions seems to have only improved that latter aspect. Despite what people say, the controls actually feel ergonomically good to me (but the vibrations suck compared to other controllers). You get used to it and little tricks to not have it track properly, like holding the gun a different way in Alyx, or jittering your hand to pop back the tracking quickly in menus. Its, a inconvenience to to be sure, its not as good as either Oculus or base stations, but it can use controllers that are compatible with the latter.

          • Shane Monroe

            If you’re playing “dino arm” maps on Beat Saber where your range of motions is small and isolated to “center mass” (which seems to be the popular genre of map making these days), I’m sure it is fine. For heavy flow, dance maps? Where you could be sweeping super low to super high? I found it completely inadequate. Perhaps you can “acclimatize” over time – like the latency when playing PC VR Beat Saber wirelessly on Quest (I can feel 25-50ms latency … adapting to it isn’t the answer). But there is no reason to put up with it if you don’t have to :) IMHO, anyway.

            I didn’t find the controllers uncomfortable at all – but yeah, the vibrations were ass).

            Thing is — I had the money to NOT compromise. G2 was touted as the Saviour of VR when in reality, it was a (IMHO) half-assed job at it. Visuals aren’t the bottom dollar for me. I’ll take QOL over a small boost in resolution any day.

  • Wow, at this point for $600 it becomes even more interesting than before

  • Pablo C

    HP G2 is THE HMD for VORPX, by the way. I´m playing most AAA games, like, in a 3D movie theater (the G2 alows that resolution and the subpar tracking is irrelevant).

  • VRFriend

    Where to order the new gasket for the original G2?

    • benz145

      They haven’t said they’ll be selling it separately.

  • VRFriend

    The original G2 gasket was tight on sides, pressing on temples. I can’t use it at all. Is this new thinner gasket wider and not pressing on temples?

    • benz145

      As far as I can tell the part that touches the face is identical in shape.

  • Thanks for the review Ben. I purchased a 3D printed frame for G2 and added a HTC Vive Pro aftermarket facepad that I have used a similar one with my Vive and Vive Pro and found the FOV better and the padding much better than HP’s. Since I don’t do anything that requires a lot of movement, I am happy with it to test OpenXR compatibility with Windows Mixed Reality. It is wonderful now being able to bypass SteamVR, yet still create Unreal Engine native VR apps in 4.27 (happy feet). Now with with new Windows 11 store, make them available to the Windows community without having to go through Steam.

  • Pablo C

    The best headset to play most of your regular AAA titles on 3D Theater mode through Vorpx (it looks great by the way).