Oculus today introduced Quest, the consumer version of the ‘Project Santa Cruz’ headset that the company first revealed way back in 2016. The headset is high-end standalone, meaning it doesn’t rely on a PC, but still manages to include the positional head and hand tracking that makes high-end headsets so immersive.

First introduced back in 2016 as Project Santa Cruz, the Quest brings full head and hand tracking to world of standalone headsets, something not yet available in similar offerings like the Lenovo Mirage Solo or Vive Focus (which both offer positional head tracking but not positional hand tracking).

Revealed today by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Quest took a premier spot in today’s Oculus Connect keynote.

To boot, the headset and Touch controller combo is said to start at $400 for the 64 GB model, and launch in Spring 2019.

The Quest is said to include “the same best-of-class optics as Oculus Go with a display resolution of 1,600 × 1,440 per eye, while incorporating a lens spacing adjustment to help maximize visual comfort.” Built-in audio, similar to Oculus Go’s, will also be included, although it’s said to include “deeper bass.”

The company is calling the 6DOF optical tracking system ‘Oculus Insight’, the system that powers inside-out tracking, Guardian, and Touch controller tracking. Using four “ultra wide-angle sensors” combined with computer vision algorithms, the setup is entirely wireless and doesn’t rely on external sensors.

SEE ALSO
Oculus Quest Hands-on and Tech Details

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  • FOV ????

    • dk

      same

      • Elle DeLonzo

        Do they ever intend to improve the FOV? I mean the Quest looks great, but lots of people have been itching for that particular improvement for a long time. Was hoping we would get some update on that today

        • gothicvillas

          Dont forget this is mobile VR

          • Peter K

            it is a high end mobile VR

        • Downvote King

          Yeah, that’s what Oculus Half-Dome is about, 140 degrees FOV, CV1 successor.

          • Elle DeLonzo

            Any word on when they might update everyone on the status of the half dome?

          • Downvote King

            I haven’t seen anything solid. Most speculation now seems to be it could be revealed next Oculus Connect and released in 2020 at the earliest.

          • Laurence Nairne

            While half dome is an improvement on a lot of areas from the current gen, they were quite adamant that it is not a successor to anything. It’s a research device that pulls together a lot of different improvements and they made the effort to explain that not all of that tech would be present in any future consumer devices – at least in the near future anyway.

            Whatever we do get in terms of a CV2 will likely contain some of this stuff, but it’s not a given that 140deg FOV is going to make it into it. I mean that could also mean it improves on it too, so only time will tell.

          • Downvote King

            I think that’s basically in reference to the fact that any CV2 is still estimated to be around 2 years away – regardless of which prototype ends up best reflecting that final product. Most pundits seem to agree that Half Dome is their prime CV2 candidate though, and at this years Connect, Oculus’ chief scientist even noted that a 4K screen would be “relatively straightforward” to add to Half Dome, so they are still working within that framework.

            It’s obviously boilerplate marketing to manage expectations in these types of ways, but it’s also still possible that another prototype overtakes Half Dome as their prime candidate. For the moment, it seems to be where most people point to for where Oculus is headed with CV2, whether that pans out or not. I tend to think it will though, each product they’ve come out with has strongly resembled the prototype they most presented to the media leading up.

            It certainly seems to meet the basic requirements of a true second gen headset; somewhat wider FOV, 4K, variable focus. Nothing crazy like 8K, 200 degree FOV, or face scanning for full VR presence, just the basics you would expect.

        • dk

          half dome is about 140 as far as I remember …who knows when something like that will be out….the quest runs on phone hardware so u can’t have a huge fov if u want good resolution too

          • Elle DeLonzo

            True. I guess I was hoping for some news from them on the half dome/next generation of the Rift, but we didn’t get anything. I guess maybe next year’s conference?

          • dk

            yeah from the time they show something to the time it’s on the market takes ages …..I would really prefer they show only stuff that r coming in 6 months
            I really hope it will at least have eye tracking and varifocal display if it’s taking this long….and they keep saying that those tech have issues

  • Just an improved version of the Oculos Go ?

    • Downvote King

      6DOF headset and controllers is a huge step up, same resolution as Vive Pro, and powerful enough to play many Rift games? This is true untethered VR.

      • Charles

        It’s 1440p vertically, not 1600p. But it’s RGB stripe rather than Pentile, so it should look at least as good.

        • Downvote King

          Both headsets are reported to have a resolution of 1440 x 1600…

          • Charles

            The Vive Pro is 1600 lines. This headset is 1440 lines. They don’t make VR screens that are taller than they are wide. When these numbers are reported, they’re not consistent about whether they list vertical or horizontal first. This has lead to confusion on past announcements too.

            But as I said, not being Pentile makes up for the lower vertical resolution, because Pentile has a lot fewer subpixels than non-pentile at the same resolution.

          • Downvote King

            The Oculus Blog lists it as 1600 x 1440, I don’t know what to say beyond this. In my experience the horizontal lines are usually listed first in the measurement in any case: ie. 1920 x 1080, 1280 x 720, 1360 x 768, etc. I’m not sure if there’s much more to go on at the moment. Glad to hear it’s Pentile too.

          • Charles

            I know – that’s the standard way, and it confused me a lot too last time when they listed it the opposite way when announcing a VR headset’s specs (forget which one).

            A VR panel has to be wider than it is tall, because of how human vision works. Also, this has been quoted as being the same panels as the Oculus Go, which has 1440 lines.

          • Peter Hansen

            That is wrong. E.g. the Vive Pro has 1440×1600 making up for a 2880×1600 in total. So clearly 1600 is the vertical pixel count. I am sure it is the same for the Oculus Go.

          • Charles

            But in a past announcement for a VR headst (I think Vive Pro) it was announced backwards and reported that way all around.

            It would be nice if they would clarify.

            I was wrong about screens needing to be wider than tall. Though it’s better that way.

          • Peter Hansen

            Depending on the FOV you try to achieve. And the lenses and its distortion. Taller than wide also applies to CV1 and Vive.

          • Downvote King

            Quest has the same glass optics as Go, but an upgraded 1600 x 1440 per eye display. It’s been reported everywhere that way, including the Oculus Blog. The only confusion I’ve seen is when Oculus said it shared the same optics as Go people assumed it was the same display as well.

            It’s the Vive Pro BTW that lists things strangely. This is from their official website: 1440 x 1600 pixels per eye (2880 x 1600 pixels combined). It’s listed that way on Dell’s site as well. Looks like it’s because once the numbers are combined they become wider than tall as you say. It may be a single display then, rather than two combined?

          • Mike

            Oh wait, hold on, I misread part of your last post, and misspoke a little. The standard way to list it is horizontal first, and the other headset I mentioned had it announced reverse of that – may have been the Vive Pro. And apparently I was wrong when I said VR screens are always wider than tall. But the Oculus Quest is listed as 1600×1440 everywhere I’ve seen, which would mean it has a wider FOV than older headsets, and only 1440p quality in terms of number of lines. So it still seems like I was right about that, unless they messed up again and announced it reverse of the standard. I was also wrong about it not being Pentile – it IS Pentile, while the Oculus Go is NOT Pentile. So this is actually a DOWNGRADE – Pentile is much WORSE for VR than non-Pentile.

          • Bob

            If Quest uses a display with pentile and Go uses RGB then you could argue they’re pretty much the same resolution.

      • Muzufuzo

        How is this powerful enough to play Rift games? With Snapdragon 835? 2017 smartphone SoC? 8800 GTX level GPU? Are you joking? We need at least GTX 1080 performance in a standalone headset like Quest to get things rolling. And no, I didn’t forget about foveated rendering, it is necessary to get 8K without going with requirements higher than for current Vive Pro (2x1440x1600). At first, however, we have to get to the Vive Pro level in mobile. Oculus Quest won’t get us there (S835 is about 1/22 of GTX 1080 performance). Maybe in 7 or 8 years.

        • Downvote King

          They’ve announced Superhot, Robo Recall, The Climb, and Moss so far. I’d be shocked if Beat Saber doesn’t make it, or whatever other games they’ve already managed to squish onto 5 year old PS4 hardware. How they do it is not my department, but the Rift is 2.5 yrs old now so… Moore’s law + special egghead optimization maybe?

          • Shiva Shakti

            yep. Super Mario World on the snes was one of the most artistically creative, fun and richest game ever produced (especially at the time) and yet the whole game fit into 1 meg.
            Disk space wasn’t as dirty cheap as it is today, so devs had no choice but to be absolute beasts at optimizing their code so it could fit into what little space available they had.
            Granted, Miyamoto is a freaking code-mutant, but he proved it possible countless times on underpowered consoles.
            Situation is the same here, devs being limited by the technical power of this platform will have to find new ways to optimize their code to work on it, and just like back in the days will produce content we never thought the platform would be able to pull off.
            Just ask any gamer old enough if he ever thought a game like Donkey Kong country would one day come into existence on his console and you’ll get your answer :)

          • Downvote King

            Imagine what Nintendo and Miyamoto could do with a Quest-like device. Perhaps next-gen Switch will be able to slot into a headset as well as dock with a TV.

            Super Mario World is a great example. Ocarina of Time fit on a 32 megabyte cartridge and Goldeneye was about 11 megabytes. It’s amazing what a skilled developer can achieve. Sometimes constraints bring out the best in people.

            The right game mechanics and art design do not need perfect lighting and textures to transport you to another world, this is even more true for VR, a technology which so fully engulfs your senses regardless of the quality of experience.

            We can only hope that someone as brilliant as Miyamoto (or perhaps even Miyamoto himself) will take VR to the next level, regardless of the processing power available to them.

          • Bob

            All those games will have significantly toned down textures, shaders and all that crap. BUT as you’ve said the developers will find ways to compensate and make it look as similar to the experiences you get on the Rift as possible so overall it’s not a big deal on the processing power front. What’s more important for the next iteration is obviously trying to improve the FOV as much as possible but of course finding a way to make foveated rendering work so you get acceptable resolution and graphics with the significantly increased FOV in a mobile and WIRELESS solution.

  • Mei Ling

    Rather surprised at the choice of name however the design looks absolutely flawless. Well done to their UX team.

    • nipple_pinchy

      I’m wondering where the heck the on-board computing is? The faceplate?

      • Laurence Nairne

        Doesn’t look like there’d be a great deal of room for it anywhere else. Can’t see any cables that could be connected to a processor puck so that options out.

  • Bob

    “The Quest is said to include “the same best-of-class optics as Oculus Go with a display resolution of 1600×1440 per eye”

    What?! You mean this thing has the same resolution as the Vive pro?

    • mellott124

      That’s awesome for a mobile system. Impressive.

    • Better be… It’s 2018.

      • Bob

        No it’s actually 2019.

    • dk

      so like the vive focus res…but some nice improvements

    • Charles

      Actually it’s 1440p vertically, not 1600p. But it’s RGB stripe rather than Pentile, so it should look at least as good.

      • Bob

        Apparently it’s a Pentile based display according to multiple sources.

        • Charles

          You’re right – I had been misinformed about that. Not sure yet whether it’s 1600 or 1440 lines – they’re writing it in the order that would usually mean 1440 lines, but they’ve been reversed in some other VR product announcements.

          • Bob

            Good thing is they’re using an OLED display, unlike the Oculus Go, so expect really great colors and contrast (absolute blacks) which I think is just as crucial as screen resolution to that immersion factor. Bad thing is there can only be so many good things at an affordable price, right? ;)

          • Charles

            True.

  • Fabian

    They should have come up with more FOV, more resolution and eye tracking/foveated rendering…. but this…boring

    • MosBen

      Compared to a bleeding edge tethered unit, like StarVR or Pimax, this might seem not very exciting. Compared to mobile systems like the Go, it’s fantastic. Mobile graphics have come a long way in the last few years, but this seems about like the best we could hope for.

      I expect that in future generations the pattern we’ll see is a new Rift comes out with big advances, then a couple years later we see a mobile version that incorporates some of those features while getting close to matching the previous generation of tethered HMDs. Then two years after that, the new tethered HMD comes out.

    • Adderstone VR

      This is not a “Rift 2”
      This fills the gap between Oculus Go and Oculus Rift.
      Project Half Dome is a much better indication of what we could expect for Rift 2 and that addresses every single one of your wishes

    • squarebone

      They could have made this not only the better Oculus Go but also a better Oculus Rift if only they would have included an additional Virtual Link connector to run the headset either mobile enjoying the 6DoF controllers or tethered to a powerful machine for the highest fidelity graphics. The value of having inside-out tracking and hassle-free setup would have been priceless in both cases

      • Andrew Jakobs

        Who says they didn’t… hehe.. maybe they use the same port for charging.. but then again, if it did, why wouldn’t they have said so, as it would be a biggy..

    • dsadas

      so you wanted to pay $1200 on this then?

      • Are ye sure it shall be that much?

      • Fabian

        Not $1200 but $500 would be ok for a device that doesn’t disappoint. They could have used the Snapdragon 845 instead of the 2 year old(!) 835, would be a difference of a few dollars. Using a mobile GPU instead of a high end GTX1080 means a very huge compromise in graphics quality and I see no efforts at all to compensate the gap. At least a Snapdragon 845 plus eyetracking and 20° more FOV would rather come up to my expectations and I see no reasons why this would take $1200 or even half of that.

  • get lost

    FOV?? it still mediocre small I suppose…

    • Doctor Bambi

      It’s using the same optics as Go so more than likely a FOV similar to Go which is also similar to Rift.
      This device really book ends the gen 1 era of headsets, being, more than likely, the best overall Gen 1 VR experience available. Gen 2 really starts to get underway next year and the year after.

      • MosBen

        I’m betting that as we move forward we’re going to see new hardware on a roughly two-year cycle, alternating between new tethered and mobile HMDs, with the mobile versions incorporating some of the advances of the most recent tethered HMD (mostly on the software and optics side), while approaching the performance of the previous generation of tethered HMD.

        • Xron

          Asfar as I understood, if they release rift 2nd by 2020, it won’t have foveated rendering and eye tracking…
          Only ~140fov, a bit higher res (without eye tracking and foveated rendering higher res would take a high end gpu to run it) and vorifocal (deepfocus technique)

          • MosBen

            I don’t know. Keep in mind that Half Dome, while certainly a prototype of what the Rift 2 may end up being, isn’t a perfect representation of what type of hardware and software we’re going to end up with. I’m sure that people at Oculus are working on foveated rendering, eye tracking, etc., and if they’re able to get it worked out in the next year or so there’s a decent chance that it will be incorporated into the Rift 2.

          • Xron

            Hope so too, though I’m not sure if Abrash would specifically mention foveated rendering and eye tracking taking a while longer, if they could integrate them by 2020.
            Anyway, I hope 2nd gen rift won’t dissapoint us, like Quest.
            Oculus Quest does not seem to be like a dissapointment (decent display,(72hz I guess) 6dof rift like controllers, playable rift titles (after optimization ofc)).

          • MosBen

            Yep, for what it is, I think the Quest looks great, though that refresh rate is worth looking into, and if true I’ll want to wait for reviews to see how it holds up.

            The thing that I think people on sites like R2VR will have a hard time accepting as we move forward with hardware cycles, particularly for tethered units like the Rift 2, is that Oculus wants to expand the audience for VR as wide as possible, as fast as possible. That’s going to mean that their products will always be somewhat conservative from a features standpoint. It’s possible that they could have made Quest more powerful, but it was important to hit that $400 price point. The Rift 2 will be a nice improvement over the first generation, but there will always be companies like Pimax making hardware that pushes the envelope further because Oculus is aiming for people that don’t necessarily have a great PC, while Pimax is aiming for the enthusiast market. That said, I expect that Oculus will always have an edge on polish, if only because it’s something that non-enthusiasts care about, but I’m at a point in my life where I don’t necessarily feel the need to live on the bleeding edge. At least my wallet doesn’t feel that need.

          • Rogue Transfer

            Oculus’ chief scientist Michael Abrash in the keynote yesterday said that he doesn’t expect to have reliable enough dynamic foveated rendering in a headset for another four years. He said he had to push his previous prediction back a year to 2022, from 2021.

            He specifically mentioned the problem of eye-tracking for it not working well enough or with everyone in the Half Dome feature prototype and being further away now.

          • dsadas

            it will definitely have foveated rendering LOL

      • Darshan

        Oculus is trying to offer as much icing on cake as possible. How can they move to Gen2/3 without perfecting Gen1.

        What parameters makes Gen1 for any person (say for you) is also important, if you consider FoV as main factor than 90 Degree is Gen1, 110 Degree is Gen2 and 140 Degree is Gen3, if you consider screen door free display as prime factor then 1280X720 is gen1 (Oculus First Dev Kit) 1920X1080 was Gen2 ( Oculus Rift Second DK) and Consumer Rift was Gen3. so exactly what you refer as parameter for Gen is important.

        Now what Oculus Quest offers is
        1) Best Optics they have developed learning form their feedback and
        production experience and R&D
        2) Best wireless 6DOF controllers
        3) Fully 6DOF tracked headset and controllers (Mind you HTC Vive focus still don’t have it)
        4) Best VR Experiences they developed over time for RIFT are being ported on more or less same quality of PC grade hardware

        Exactly what revolution people are looking for, my friends this is biggest one could be offered at $400 i was expecting praise…

        • Eye Tracking, 8K Res, wide FOV, wireless PCVR gaming(Or streaming PCVR games if standalone), Foveated Rendering, making use of USB-C on new gfx cards, realy nice lens that vastly improveimmersion, etc. and perhaps HDR screens.

          This all screems next gen and a HUGE boost for VR immersion especially playing all games at ultra settings on 90 fps or higher literally questing your existence in the orld by wondering if this world is real as your brain cant feel the difference…something like that.

          There ya go.

          And of course the AAA VR games especialy narrative driven storyies the likes of God of War and Spiderman.

          • Darshan

            You just missed Witcher…

            Isn’t Eye tracking, 8K Res, Wider FOV need more processing power? Is it there on mobile version? We haven’t seen decent 4K mobile themself … How to expect it in VR then?

            Isn’t what Oculus Quest offer at present is wonderful?

        • Doctor Bambi

          You’re definitely right in saying generational leaps have become a very subjective matter. This concept of generations, at least from my perspective, really came about from the early days of consoles where technology improvements released at a much slower pace than today. Nowadays companies release products year over year, preferring iterative improvements over the old ‘generational leap’ model and it’s hard to know when we’ve crossed a line into a new generation of tech.

          I think the important thing here is that we don’t confuse what Quest is in relation to Go and Rift. If we called Rift a gen 1 headset and Quest a gen 2 headset, it would be easy for people to assume that Quest is capable of everything Rift can do and more, but of course that’s not the case. Quest and Rift provide considerably different experiences, and same goes for Go. The way Oculus are framing these headsets is that they each represent the first consumer product in their respective categories, in that sense, they are all Gen 1 devices.

          • Bob

            Indeed and you could say that a “generational leap” is a multitude of iterations over a period of time. Iterations, of course, didn’t really exist back then depending on how you perceive that term.

    • nipple_pinchy

      Dude, do you have any idea how monumentally awesome it is that we’re getting a standalone, wireless 6DOF HMD with that resolution for frickin $400?

      You gotta make some concessions. It’s an amazing piece of kit for that price and is going to be the one tht casuals buy in droves because it’s an all-on-one kit.


      • Not monumentally awesome next gen tech, thats for sure.

        No eye tracking(fov rendering), no huge jump in res and no wide FOV.

        This is a nice side product and not a good main product.

        Main product(if standalone) at least must at least stream PCVR games.

        And look like actual next gen product.

        “Dude, do you have any idea how monumentally awesome it is that we’re
        getting a standalone, wireless 6DOF HMD with that resolution for frickin
        $400?

        I could do even better and mention the $200 one since you neglected to put “high end” in your post :3

        FoV/Eye Tracking/Resolution/Lens are what matters most, anyway as well as wireless(or stream from PC if stand alone).

        If products like these are the future w/o official PC streaming, VR ports shall pop up less.

        Porting to another device may scare some Devs away.

    • Darshan

      Did’t people were upset with screen door? Is more FoV with more screen door is ok ? Ok for All? Isn’t more FoV need more processing power? Do we have it? If they offer santa cruz and ask for $1000 exactly how many of us will buy it?

  • TheObserver0

    What kind of processing power will it have? Snapdragon 835, 845?

    • MosBen

      Definitely one of those two. My guess is on the latter.

      • Xron

        Hope that they can include 845…, 835 does nor seem like a legit upgrade over Go’s 821…

        • MosBen

          I mean, the 835 came out in 2016. I find it pretty hard to believe that they would have been hardware locked that long ago. I’m reasonably sure that it’s the 845, but I’m sure that we’ll see later today or tomorrow.

          • Muzufuzo

            835 was launched Q2 2017, three quarters after 821.

          • MosBen

            Ah, I see. It looks like it was announced in November 2016, but Samsung got all of the initial chips because it co-developed the 835 with Qualcomm. The 845 was announced in December 2017. It still seems like it should have been possible to use the 845, since they’re not launching until next Spring. But maybe there are cost reasons or something else I didn’t consider.

            But thanks for the correction.

          • Muzufuzo

            so Quest will be using 2-year old chip, it would be all right for something like Go 2 with 199$ pricetag but for 399$? no, 2017 S835 is too weak

          • JP

            It’s a good start. Once eye tracking and foviated rendering come into play, like Oculus said, we may be looking at a 20x performance. Just immagine 2080ti graphic quality from an S845. It won’t be that incredible, but the idea is that a mobile chip potentially can supply most of our needs in the future.

          • Muzufuzo

            Maybe if you have small needs. If I had to choose between all-in-one VR and tethered PC VR that is 100x more powerful, I choose the latter.

          • MosBen

            That’s fine. Those exist, and will likely continue to exist for the foreseeable future. And even if Oculus doesn’t design the Rift 2 to really push the boundaries of hardware, there will still be the Pimaxes of the world that will make products to serve the enthusiast market. But right now I think that it’s more important to broaden the audience in VR; to get as many people to regularly use a VR device as possible. That would bring more money into the industry and allow for more AAA development, as well as being a large enough audience to support interesting experiments that will help define the creative language of the medium. And to do that you don’t need HMDs powered by the newest, most expensive RTX graphics cards. Indeed, relying on those cards shrinks the potential audience to a small number of hardcore enthusiasts with big wallets.

            Making VR a mass market medium means putting out products that give a compelling experience, with comfortable ergonomics, all at an affordable price. The graphics and FOV produced by the Quest isn’t going to wow Pimax 8KX owners with RTX 2080Tis in their machines, but it’s a really compelling product for people that just want to play some fun VR games and get into the hobby. There’s a good chance that this is a breakthrough product. That should be exciting for everyone that cares about VR.

          • Justos

            you’re in the minority by at least 1000x

    • Andrew Jakobs

      My guess is the 845.

    • guds777

      Intel 486. :D

    • Darshan

      835 their webpage said. But wish it to be shipped with SD845 its very much possible.

    • Laurence Nairne

      I’d also be inclined to say battery life is going to suffer. If it’s 845 I think I recall better battery management so it might not be so alarming, but 835 will probably suck it dry in a couple hours. Depends on what the power unit is as well of course – doesn’t look like you’d fit a great deal in there though.

  • sfmike

    This will certainly enlarge the user base big time. The addition of a Star Wars launch title will also sell units. The bigger the user base the more money will be spent on VR development and the faster we will see all the high end improvements us early adopters want. Being wireless is a BIG deal.

    • MosBen

      I’m still surprised that they didn’t announce a version of Marvel Powers United with somewhat toned down graphics for the Quest. Pairing Star Wars and Marvel as launch titles would be a pretty big selling point for people.

      • MosBen

        After watching the video, it really looks like she’s got Hulk hands at one point. That’s not definitive, obviously, but I’m counting it as a point in favor.

        • Darshan

          Exactly i too feel Marvel powers united is bound to come at some point in future.. I too noticed those hulk hands…

      • nipple_pinchy

        They need to. I wish WB would get off their butts and make some primo VR content based on DC.

        • MosBen

          I’m pretty sure that they will. Marvel Powers is pretty graphically complex, but Oculus spent a lot of time and money developing that game while they were also developing the Quest. I have a hard time believing that they didn’t plan the development of that game so that it could be scaled down for the Quest, which I definitely think will outsell the Rift.

          • nipple_pinchy

            I don’t mind stripped down versions of titles I already enjoy on PCVR as long as the mechanics are maintained. Give me a few really solid boxing sims and a few solid ping pong games and I’ll be happy with just that.

          • nipple_pinchy

            Yeah, the more titles the better. I want a bunch of fitness-oriented apps. Anything that gets me moving and I’ll buy it.

  • MosBen

    Man, I kind of hoped that they’d hit that $400 price point, but it’s fantastic that they did. That’s definitely going to make is super attractive to people interested in giving VR a try.

    • nipple_pinchy

      That price point is INSANE. I was predicting $550-600. Quest will be the first mainstream VR headset that’ll be a impulse buy from casuals. This is so exciting.

      • MosBen

        Agreed. I was hoping for $400 but expecting something closer to $500. Realistically, $400 isn’t cheap, but it’s well within the range of “really nice gift”, rather than “enthusiast piece of tech that you only buy for yourself”.

        • paratay

          F-ing Trolls both you retards.

          • Laurence Nairne

            Who hurt you, friend?

        • Darshan

          $400 its a wonderful price point, consider rift a wired headset which still required $800/2000 PC to power it. Fully wireless and do not need any other hardware is just right thing.. over all its more cheap than PSVR. Bravo Oculus its really good. Now bring best titles to Oculus Quest like Lone echo. (Any way they are bringing Robo Recall , Climb , Dead and burried So just right direction too)

      • c1cc10x

        Absolutely!!At that price i’m actually glad i didn’t buy the oculus go…

        • nipple_pinchy

          VR tech is improving so rapidly that it’s kind of mind-boggling. It seems like yesterday I was using a DK2. Now I have a Samsung Odyssey with inside-out tracking and it cost me $400. Now we’re getting a standalone headset in Quest and other companies are prepping 200-degree FOV HMDs and 4K, .etc. Just crazy rapid improvements.

          • Muzufuzo

            Complete opposite to what I feel, it seems like VR is progressing very slowly. 2014 1920×1080 with GTX 980 and 240 GB SSD, 2019 mobile VR with 1440×3200, 8800 GTX and 64 GB storage, battery lasts up to three hours. Tracking is much better but you still can’t get accurate full body tracking with Rift.

  • Same display tech as GO, which also means on 72fps, like Go, not 90 fps like Rift. Slower frame-rates are definitely an issue.

    • MosBen

      Do you mean 72hz? I’m no expert, but isn’t fps related to how many frames the graphics computing hardware is rendering, while the hz refers to the refresh rate of the displays?

      But yes, that’s definitely something worth looking into.

    • Andrew Jakobs

      Slower frame-rates are not an issue.. framerate isn’t really a problem for motion sickness.. that’s just BS.. Other factors are way WAAAAAAAY more important, where the biggest one is adjusting the IPD and focus better..

    • Darshan

      You are confusing FPS and Hz, FPS is how many frames per second GPU sends to display and Hz is how many times display engine rewrites information on display. Hz and FPs both are different parameters. If you have lower Hz you will notice flicker if you have lower FPs you will notice action slow. when Hz and FPs largely mis match ghosting and visual artifacts occurs. mostly GPU tries to match FPs in a way with Hz that it does not produce anomaly on screen. If GPU is capable enough to totally match FPS and Hz you can get best image quality.

      • brandon9271

        The fps and hz are typically syncronized to prevent screen tearing. If the screen is 72hz than the maximum fps is also 72, at least as we perceive it

        • Darshan

          Yes but this synchronization also induce other effects if FPS are not meeting closely to Hz.

          My point was to fred its 72Hz and not 72Fps, Also Rift is 90Hz and not 90FPs.

  • Bob

    Hey Ben do you know if this has OLED or LCD?

  • Darren

    So basically Oculus Go 2.0.

    • nipple_pinchy

      It’s way more than that.

      • How? It jus plays highend games at higher res, thats it.

        • Rogue Transfer

          It doesn’t play high-end games. It’s only the slightly better Snapdragon 835 from the Oculus Go’s 821, performance-wise.

          It’s benefits are that it has 6DOF tracking & 6DOF controllers, which allows a similar type of play, but with a much lower quality than PC 6DOF VR.

          • ShiftyInc

            There is a big difference in preformance between the 821 & 835.

      • Darren

        It has a Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 processor, essentially still just a mobile… The main new things are 6DOF and touch controllers, hence why I called it Oculus Go 2.0.

        • nipple_pinchy

          You can call it Oculus Snapping Turtle 2.0, but it doesn’t change the fact that it’s an awesome piece of kit that’s going to be transformative for the VR industry.

  • Zal

    Is this the Santa Cruz?

  • nipple_pinchy

    This is my Holy Grail VR headset. I’m buying at least 3 when they drop. One for me, one for each of my kids and I might even gift one or two to people.

    I am so hyped. Finally a premium, standalone, wireless 6DOF HMD.

    • Muzufuzo

      Realistically it is still to weak in specs to play true full Rift games in native resolution and 72 fps.

      • Muzufuzo

        it won’t be faster than what is in SGS9 and that smartphone isn’t fast enough

        • c1cc10x

          It will be a dedicated device… designed to deliver the best vr experience where the SGS9 is a general purpose device.. a bit like a game console VS a PC with the same cpu/gpu : the console is optimized to run games with best performances and the minimum hassle where a pc can do a lot of things but probably not run games as well as a console

          • Skippy76

            You’re funny man… A PC can run games MUCH better than a console! Why do you think the rift and vive are far superior to the PSVR?

          • c1cc10x

            :D yes, i’m funny TY :D

            I said pc with same cpu/gpu…
            I think a pc with same cpu/gpu as a ps4 or a xbox one it’s not so good to run games (not as a the original game console), don’t you think?

          • Muzufuzo

            only the cpu would be a problem

          • c1cc10x

            yes, let’s hope is a 845 … but with all the hardware they packed in it (for the inside-out mapping) maybe it’s a bit greedy from our part…they promised ARENA, not room scale, Arena scale… i’m excited :’D

          • Muzufuzo

            maybe it is a custom 845, specially for VR

          • Rogue Transfer
          • Muzufuzo

            HOW WEAK

          • dsadas

            c1cc10x, not even close. I mean gta V runs on 256 of ram and 190 gbflops gpu and 1 core cpu(ps3). To run gta V with similar visual fidelity on a pc you need 8 gb of ram(32x times more) at least 4 cores cpu and nearly 8x the gbflops.

          • Muzufuzo

            WHAT? you don’t know what you are writing about and clearly haven’t tested GTA V using integrated graphics.

          • Skippy76

            I think they are essentially the same. Doesnt the xbox1 run on windows 10 now? One thing is for sure.. Consoles are much cheaper than a gaming rig…

      • nipple_pinchy

        Well, of course. Everyone makes concessions. You don’t watch movies on your phone and complain about the size of the screen.

        If I can play a few titles like Thrill of the Fight, Racket Fury and BoxVR on Quest, it’ll be worth the money to me.

        • Muzufuzo

          S845 has only 29.8 GB/s of memory bandwidth. Compare that to new gaming PCs (or consoles like Xbox One X).

          • nipple_pinchy

            sigh

          • Better gfx = mega immersion :3

        • Muzufuzo

          Kirin 980 has 34.1 but that’s still not much.

    • MosBen

      Same here. I may well purchase two so that my wife and I can play some games together and look like total nerds. Yes, of course, there will be subsequent generations that widen the FOV, increase the resolution, etc., but this feels to me like the first VR device that people are going to want to play with on a regular basis.

      • nipple_pinchy

        As it is right now, when I want to use VR I have to go into my office. Being able to have an HMD that’s sitting on my nightstand that I can pop on when I get out of bed and burn some calories will be incredible. My wife is going to hate my Quest. lol

        • MosBen

          And on that note, being able to put the whole system away and out of site is huge for people who don’t want to dedicate a room to a VR setup. People aren’t going to leave a whole room empty for those times that they want to play Beat Saber, but they will be willing to move a table or couch temporarily to make some impromptu space.

          • nipple_pinchy

            And demoing is going to explode. It’s going to be like the old console days when you’d take a game over to a friend’s house for multiplayer.

          • MosBen

            Yep. I know that I’ll be bringing it with me when I visit my family or go to a friend’s house. Of course, part of that depends on how easy it is to set up a new play space. Hopefully it’s fast and easy.

    • paratay

      You have gone full retard buddy go f-k youre self. It’s idiots like you why it’s actually going backwards

      • nipple_pinchy

        Get help, basement dweller.

  • Sawoy

    I had no problem with Facebook buying Oculus, but now I’m starting to realize that it might have been the worst thing for me as a VR enthusiast. And Mark saying this marks the end of the first gen VR without actuality launching a second gen Rift is just appalling. I’m really sad for the future of VR at the moment.

    And I don’t get why you people in “road to vr” are more vocal about it. Seems like your just playing along. While all of us who wants a real next gen rift gets left in the dust. It’s also us who paved the way for VR in the first place. Facebook should remember that.

    For me, this year’s oculus connect was a huge hit below the middle.

    • brandon9271

      I completely agree. I don’t understand why Oculus has pretty much abandoned the PC VR space. Even a simple refresh with better optics would be welcomed. A CV1.1 without those damned God rays. It’s sad really. Mobile VR will always be subpar but i guess this is where the industry is going. This might be the only way VR becomes mainstream at this point

    • Laurence Nairne

      Oculus (and by proxy Facebook) know that PC tethered VR has to be a major improvement on it’s previous iteration else you’ll get the flack that Vive Pro did. Simply improving optics isn’t good enough.

      Added to this, Oculus released details about their R&D HMD which contained a lot of improvements that aren’t present in Quest (that we’ve been told about anyway), so it stands to reason that this will come in a CV2 when it’s ready.

      True tech innovation takes time, and the big players don’t have the luxury of releasing dev kits masquerading as commercial products this time around – they need to get it right. It’s the same reason Apple are beavering away in the dark until they’re ready to release a product the mass market will actually want.

      • Rogue Transfer

        It’s worth noting Michael Abrash provided additional details(in the keynote) about the feature prototype R&D 140° HMD only had a “similar resolution of Rift”.

        • Laurence Nairne

          Oh sure, but then there’s plenty of research going into increasing pixel counts in a HMD, so they probably left that out to focus on other areas. I’m not a spokesperson for, or necessarily a fan of Oculus, I’m just saying that they are definitely not leaving PC tethered behind.

    • Mark did not say there will be no Rift2! He said we are not announcing that today.
      I’m sure there will be a Go2, a Quest2, a Rift2.

      • Bob

        No there will no Go 2 because the Go was actually a side project from the actual project they were working on which was Santa Cruz as mentioned by John Carmack. The Go was a stopgap to “test the waters” so to speak and build a foundation for an existing user base or in other words to establish their footprint in mobile VR.

        There will also likely be no Rift 2 depending on the success of the Quest. If the Quest proves to be a massive success there is no reason for Oculus to divide their attention between two distinct product branches when they may focus all their effort on one and do a better job out of it. Also with foveated rendering on the horizon why would there be any need to take a step back and revert to wired VR experiences when wireless is really the only way to go (once you go wireless you can’t really go back)?

        • Laurence Nairne

          There’s an article somewhere that disagrees with you as they were considering next gen Go features.

          • Bob

            Right so it seems I was wrong on that front. Judging from that speech he did it would now seem likely they’re going for a two-pronged approach; a low-end, low budget product range and high-end, high budget product range.

            Personally I do believe it would make more sense for them to merge the Rift and Quest into one single high-end VR device with the option to tether to a PC or their own propriety device which allows more processing power. Then the Go would be a toned down version of this device to be made more affordable to the masses.

          • Laurence Nairne

            From a consumer perspective that might make sense, though the extra weight might be an issue.

            But I’d say it depends on how tall Oculus want to build their walled garden If they make it tetherable then they make it Steam compatible as well.

  • Twa Corbies

    yawn

  • Yesss! Been waitin ages for this. Now just waiting for full reviews on games. Hopefully it performs well.

  • paratay

    The entire VR industry is being raped by these sort of products and forced on to the gullible consumer as the ‘ future ‘ of VR. It is ‘ Virtual Reality ‘ people, NOT ‘ Virtual cartooney ‘ graphics. They are going backwards to say the least.

    We WANT 170+ FOV
    We WANT GOOD Lenses, for the love of god, DO F–ing Custom NON-Fresnel Lenses you have the cash Facebook
    We WANT TO USE OUR LATEST HARDWARE such as 2080Ti for Best possible CG

    STOP manipulating people facebook and do some real progress.
    On top of all that $400 is an insult and way too expensive.

    Zuckerberg only wants a mediocre HMD for the ‘general ‘ public so he can have the ability to shove facebook type SM up your you know what…

    • ShiftyInc

      Good thing you are not running their VR department, or for any other company that is. VR would be dead before we know it otherwise. If you want all those things from any company i would go in to hibernation for 8 years.

      • paratay

        Give me a break for f-ks sake, I swear you should watch idiocracy. You must be young dumb and full of cum:) just f off and do a little research for like 10 years before opening your mouth. Sheeeep

        • ShiftyInc

          There is only one dumb kid here and we can all point him out. I have seen you do nothing but call people a troll and names because they like a product that you do not. Do some research yourself, cause your delusional.

    • MrKingBob

      The difference here is that while the Rift is tethered to a PC AND requires external sensors to track, this headset does all of the tracking internally AND all of the processing internally, so all of things you mentioned are impossible.

      • MrKingBob

        *Note: Non-Fresnel would be nice though*

  • W/o at least streaming PCVR games, VR gfx is gonna suck. And many future VR ports may evaperate due to lack of interest in porting to a device as opposed to PCVR ports and what of crossplay like Payday VR?

    So when is this coming?

    Eye Tracking, 8K Res, wide FOV, wireless PCVR gaming(Or streaming
    PCVR games if standalone), Foveated Rendering, making use of USB-C on
    new gfx cards, realy nice lens that vastly improveimmersion, etc. and
    perhaps HDR screens.

    This all screems next gen
    and a HUGE boost for VR immersion especially playing all games at ultra
    settings on 90 fps or higher literally questing your existence in the
    orld by wondering if this world is real as your brain cant feel the
    difference…something like that.

    There ya go.

    And of course the AAA VR games especialy narrative driven storyies the likes of God of War and Spiderman.

  • Nads

    So is this an improvement over CV1? In terms of specs and graphics ability, would i get a better image from this over my current CV1? Basically is it any sort of improvement that would want me to sell my current CV1 and upgrade to this instead? Also will i be able to play all my current Oculus games i have purchased on the pc oculus store or will i have to purchase everything again?

    • Justos

      it will be a much cleaner image to the eyes, but the graphical fidelity of games will not be as good. Though its standalone so,…

      Its a trade off that most people (not cv1 enthusiasts) would take. And this price point? This is gonna sell.

  • Raphael

    Octopus still innovating. I do wonder if they will produce another PC VR system at some point but I can understand their push to deliver self-contained no-fuss VR. Ditching annoying USB tracking cams, headset wires and still bringing 6dof is good.

    • ShiftyInc

      They litterly said during their briefing that Rift 2 is also in the work. But that is for a later date. So yeah it is coming at some point.

  • Peter Hansen

    The “64 GB model”. Welcome back at the smartphone level where on-system memory will catapult prices to ginormous heights.

  • Nate S

    No PC connection? Only Xbox 360 / PS3 processing power? Uh, oh…