As we head into 2019, there’s a growing sense of bated breath within the VR industry as the Oculus Quest launch draws near. Today the headset popped up in FCC listings, seemingly indicating that things are on track for the Spring 2019 release.

After showing off prototypes in years prior, Oculus formally announced Quest in September, saying that the high-end standalone headset would launch in Spring 2019 priced at $400. Now filings for the headset from Facebook have appeared at the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

The FCC is tasked with certifying products with electromagnetic emissions to be safe and compatible with regulations. Products utilizing radio, WiFi, infrared, etc. need certification before they can be distributed for sale. Certification by the FCC marks one step closer to the launch of consumer electronics product.

SEE ALSO
Oculus Quest Hands-on and Tech Details

While the documents don’t specifically name Quest, a diagram shows what appears to be the signature silhouette of the headset, and model number (MH-B) aligns nicely with the company’s prior headset, Oculus Go (MH-A). So unless we just discovered a previously unknown headset, this filing is for Quest.

The filings, mostly comprised of test reports, indicate that the headset has 2.4GHz & 5GHz WiFi, as well as Bluetooth. Mostly expected, though the confirmation of 5GHz WiFi means the headset will have access to much greater bandwidth for streaming content than if it were stuck with just 2.4GHz. Bluetooth will likely be used as the primary communication method for the headset’s controllers.

Filings also indicate that some Quest units were received by the testing firm as early as July 25th, 2018, which suggests that Quests final hardware components were locked down at least that early.

Aside from the publicly available documentation, Facebook, like many companies, has submitted a Confidentiality Request to keep the following FCC documents out of the public eye:

  • Schematic Diagram
  • Block Diagram
  • Part List
  • Operational Description
  • Tune-up Procedure

While the company hasn’t divulged a more specific release date than ‘Spring’, Facebook seems like it could be readying the headset for launch at F8, the company’s annual developer conference, which will be held April 30th & May 1st, 2019. That would mirror the way it launched its last headset, Oculus Go, at F8 earlier this year.

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  • Tommy

    Can’t wait for the Quest! I wish they would release more info on launch games

    • JesuSaveSouls

      The journey is that the quest must be conquered.

    • Arashi

      I never understood the fun of a standalone unit with piss poor GPU performance (in comparison to RTX series)

      • Kevin White

        Should be 2 to 3 times as powerful as a PS3 or XBox 360, but with 8 times the RAM. Resolution should be good and they’ll ensure everything runs at the screen refresh rate. VR doesn’t have to have the latest in anti-aliasing, lighting, filtering, etc, or monster polygon counts, or massive textures, to be convincing. I think provided the controllers have a decent tracking range (and they should, compared to WMR), the freedom of being completely untethered could be excellent, and it will definitely be easier for non-technical people to use than PC-based VR. This could be great for the growth of VR.

        • dk

          yes “2 to 3 times as powerful as a PS3 or XBox 360” also known as 2 years old phone hardware ….yes it will be enough for plenty of stuff and everyone will be happy with what it can do ….doesn’t change the fact that it would have been an excellent device if it had optional pc connection with 90hz mode and fixed foveated rendering off if the pc doesn’t need it

          • Kevin White

            Can’t argue with that, would have been great if it could also serve as a wired PC VR device.

        • bmichaelb

          The Quest uses the Snapdragon 835…a Samsung Galaxy S8. It has a maximum 72 frames per second. PCVR is 90 frames per second, and certain experiences ported to the Oculus Go show a noticeable jitter in certain scenes because of the reduction in frame rates. The Go does 60 fps, or 72 when needed. As for VR not needing to have the latest in anti-aliasing…have you actually tried VR? Jagged edges everywhere, and it’s strapped to your face. Star Wars Droid repair on the Rift can look smooth with supersampling, but trying watching the experience on the Go is literally impossible with all the artifacts shimmering on literally every surface. You can’t supersize, and there’s no anti-aliasing. It’s horrible.

          • Kevin White

            I don’t remember reading many complaints at the OC event about the Quest’s refresh rate, but we’ll see. I remember the DK2 feeling pretty fluid at 75 Hz.

            Yes, I’ve used VR extensively. Yes, VR likes at least some supersampling. I was just listing off some of the ‘nice-to-haves’ and included advanced pre and post processing AA as one of them. I haven’t tried the Go at all (surprised they even have Droid Repair on it). Obviously more power is always better, but I think that properly designed and/or tweaked games and experiences could still be convincing and compelling on this hardware.

            I’m intrigued enough by the prospect of 6DoF in a completely untethered form factor to consider buying the Quest and looking forward to it. But apart from that I’m also semi-optimistic that it could bring new a lot of new users into VR, helping boost the profitability for developers who might port new games and experiences to SteamVR.

            We’ll see.

          • bmichaelb

            You made it sound as if VR didn’t need anti-aliasing, which is why I responded in the first place. That’s just false. Everything needs supersampling. Hell…even just opening a web browser in Oculus Go is all jagged edges. It’s similar to a 4K video downsampled to 1080p. You’re bound to get jagged edges. As for the frame rate…as I said, you can literally see the drop in frame rate. The only experience that was smooth, was Henry. Everything else had jitters here and there. That’s what happens when you take a 90fps source, and reduce it to 60 or 72. You’re bound to see jitters when objects move. Hell…try watching a 90 fps 3D video at only 60 or 72 fps…the very same jitters. And when the thing is strapped to your face, within inches from your eye balls…there’s no escaping the imperfections. And after a few minutes, they can actually lead to making you sick. At the very least, give you a headache.

            As for being untethered…I’m all for wireless, but unless it has outside-in trackers, then I wouldn’t want it. Try playing Echo Arena, holding on the wall while looking at the game play…then try and push off. Unless you’re actually looking at the controllers, you won’t actually move. The guys from Tested already discovered that with the Quest. If you’re playing a game where you’re hanging from a beam, with your arms above you…you won’t be able to look around or below you, without having the controllers glitch out on you. The same with a shooter game, with a gun in each hand, hands held out to your sides. If you look to the left for more than a few seconds…the right controller will glitch out. Look to the right…the left will glitch out. Unless you are holding your controllers in front of you the entire game…then you’re going to have issues. On top of that…if you want full-body tracking…you can’t do it with inside-out cameras. Seeing someone dance with full-body tracking is pretty cool. As far as I’m concerned, inside-out tracking is a downgrade, not an upgrade.

          • Michael Slesinski

            tracking aside we all know that if you give developers a less powerful platform TO MAKE MONEY FROM they will aim low to get their product infront of more eyes. so i 100% hope this thing literally blows up in peoples faces. we need BETTER games, not worse ones that can run on INFERIOR hardware.

          • bmichaelb

            That touches on another very important point…fist and foremost, they all want to sell games. That’s why they’re in the business to begin with. If the headset only has a 32 or 64 GB storage capacity, they aren’t going to sell as many games as they’d all like. Unless the user can move both games and saved game data from the headset to the pc, allowing them to load up whatever games they want for that particular session, then the damn thing is going to run out of space pretty fast. Yes, they’ll reduce the size when porting from the Rift to the Quest, but they can only shrink it so much. Henry for the Oculus Rift is 4.76 GB’s, while it’s 2.60 GB’s for the Oculus Go. Marvel Powers United for the Rift is 56.19 GB’s…even if reduced to 28 or 30 GB’s, that’s still more than 1/2 of what the headset will hold beyond the operating system already installed on the same 64 GB system disk. That’s the biggest drawback to portable VR that doesn’t require a pc. For me, it’s just too limited.

          • Kevin White

            Yes, VR needs supersampling. It doesn’t necessarily need some of the other graphical flourishes to produce presence. That’s really what I meant. Shouldn’t have used “anti-aliasing” as an example.

            If you watch something recorded at 90 fps at 60 or 72, I’m not surprised you’d see a frame hitch / jitter. But a game being rendered in real-time at 72 fps on a 72 Hz screen should just be a consistent 72 Hz, perhaps not as ideally smooth as the same rendered at 90 fps on a 90 Hz screen but it shouldn’t have a particular frame hitch to it. That said, I know some people are more sensitive (particularly in VR) to lower screen refreshes, so we’ll see how that pans out.

            As far as the tracking, there’s no doubt headset-based tracking cameras can produce compromised controller tracking. I wrote extensively about that on Reddit when I had the Odyssey. Yet I’m hoping the Quest is significantly better in that respect due to its much wider spread of camera vision compared to WMR. It still won’t match Rift or Vive, for sure, but it could be this side of “good enough” for most things.

            At the end of the day, the Quest may not be for you. I’m going to give it a go myself and I’m hoping it finds its way into the hands of a lot of people who don’t want to mess with PC+GPU.

          • bmichaelb

            “If you watch something recorded at 90 fps at 60 or 72, I’m not surprised you’d see a frame hitch / jitter. But a game being rendered in real-time at 72 fps on a 72 Hz screen should just be a consistent 72 Hz, perhaps not as ideally smooth as the same rendered at 90 fps on a 90 Hz screen but it shouldn’t have a particular frame hitch to it. That said, I know some people are more sensitive (particularly in VR) to lower screen refreshes, so we’ll see how that pans out.”

            Except for the fact many of the games themselves are a bunch of scenes, that are essentially video based, not randomly computer generated. The games that have been tried on the Quest so far are basic…background scenes don’t move, if much at all. Characters talk to you. Imagine Robo Recall, with all the robots running around…now imagine that at only 72 fps. Any scene where you’re going to have fast moving objects is going to have frame rate stutter. It’s inevitable.

            Personally in my opinion, console VR will be the saving grace for people who don’t want to mess with, or can’t afford the pc. PSVR sold more headsets than both Rift and Vive combined. It’s a far more budget friendly way to get into VR, and the experience will surpass any standalone headset that comes to market. And that’s just the first gen PSVR. Gen 2’s going to be even better…they’re working on full 360 tracking.

          • Kevin White

            Video-based scenes? What game has video-based scenes?

            If it’s doing realtime 3D graphics, it’ll either render and display each frame in under 13.89 seconds, or it won’t. If it’s hitting 72 fps / Hz, that is not “frame stutter” it’s just a “lower frame rate” compared to 90 fps / Hz. My bet is the graphics (polygons, textures, effects, etc.) will be scaled appropriately so that the games hit 72 fps.

            A way to store games externally would be helpful. Waiting to see what the save state storage scheme is like. I don’t necessarily see this platform as something they’d try to put a game like Fallout 4 or the like on. 55 GBs may give you space for 5-10 decent and fun experiences that bring something new beyond just “pancake game brought into VR.” Some of my most memorable VR experiences of the past few years have involved relatively small storage sizes and rudimentary graphics.

            I think this kind of VR is needed. In fact, I think we need many levels of VR. But clearly the Quest won’t appeal at all to some users, and that’s fine.

            PSVR is decent, but Quest has the potential to enable significantly more robust headset tracking and tracking area, at least vs. the current PSVR. If PSVR2 hits around the same time as PS5 and has excellent tracking, much improved controllers, and potentially things like wireless transmission, wide FOV, or eye tracking, it could be huge for VR as well.

          • bmichaelb

            “Video-based scenes? What game has video-based scenes?”

            Literally every VR experience out there, and certain portions of certain games. Like when Odin is flying above you in Robo Recall…that’s a video. In experiences…like Invasion, Asteroids, or even the roller coaster rides…those are videos, and they all have frame stutter on the Go at only 72 fps. Hell…even the Lone Echo 2 trailer for the Go has jitters. As well as jagged edges everywhere because you can’t supersample.

            “As far as the tracking, there’s no doubt headset-based tracking cameras can produce compromised controller tracking. I wrote extensively about that on Reddit when I had the Odyssey.”

            Wow…you mean I’m talking to a celebrity?? Is that supposed to make you an expert or something? Everybody writes on Reddit. That doesn’t make it anything special.

            “PSVR is decent, but Quest has the potential to enable significantly more robust headset tracking and tracking area, at least vs. the current PSVR.”

            Not even close. Tracking area maybe, but not tracking quality. As I said before…unless the controllers are in front of you the entire game, they’ll glitch out. I just watched a game where the guy was climbing a ladder up the side of a wall, then looks around to see the scenery. You can’t do that with inside-out tracking. Hold the controllers at your sides while looking at something above you…you’ll lose tracking. You say you’re ‘hoping’ the Quest’s 4 cameras will be better than the WMR…it may have a wider field of view, but that doesn’t do much for what’s right in front of you. Hold the controllers too close to your chest…they’ll lose tracking. The angle of the cameras can’t even see your feet. They can’t see the controllers held at your sides. And they sure as hell can’t see the controllers above your head. Sure, the user can ‘compensate’…but then that takes away from the experience. Unless they put cameras all around the headset, then it’s going to be a sub-par experience. You want to sell people on VR…not show them some lame-assed version of it.

            “55 GBs may give you space for 5-10 decent and fun experiences that bring something new beyond just “pancake game brought into VR.” Some of my most memorable VR experiences of the past few years have involved relatively small storage sizes and rudimentary graphics.”

            Good for you. You like simple games that most people would avoid. Small games means limited replay value due to limited scenes. VR is growing…that includes the games. AAA games are bigger. Even then…most people aren’t going to spend $400 on something that only holds 5-10 games.

            A device that has limited racking, limited storage, can’t do supersampling, and only has 2-3 hours of battery life is not what VR needs. ConsoleVR will still wipe the floor with it. Guaranteed.

          • Kevin White

            I’ve used the Vive (~150 hrs) and the Odyssey (~80 hrs), not the Rift (~2-3 hrs), but in the dozens or hundreds of games and so forth that I’ve tried, I’ve never played one that had “video-based scenes.” You labor under some misconceptions and self-serving biases about realtime rendering, framerate and screen refresh, etc.

            You’re a bit of a dick as well, taking each thing I write as some kind of personal affront, wherein you’re then required to express your internet butthurtness, which makes it unproductive to continue conversing with you. My Christmas wish for you is this: grow up! :o)

            Anyway, cheers and enjoy your holiday!

          • bmichaelb

            lol…get over yourself dude.

        • Adrian Meredith

          lol this wont produce graphics anywhere near a ps3, its mobile hardware pushing 4x the pixels (since most ps3 games weren’t even 720p)

        • Mike

          Actually, anti-aliasing and supersanpling are the most important things in VR, because aliasing is a constant reminder that you’re just looking at a computer screen.

      • SimonH

        I do, and I’ve got 4 rigs with 1×1070 2×1080 and a 2080. PC VR is like PC gaming… for enthusiasts who don’t mind updating drivers, debugging why the tracking isn’t working. But if you just want to play a game in VR in a space as big (Or bigger) than a sportshall then quest will allow that. Your not going to get Skyrim ln it, but Rec Room, Superhot, Gorn, SPT… some of my favourites from the Vive should run easily. I cant wait to play Gorn in a space the size of the actual arena! I broke a monitor and Vive controller in a 4.5×4.5m room! If you go to google trends and compare searches of Xbox, PS4 and gaming PC… the latter is a line along the bottom. And PC VR is a subset of that :(

      • Schorsch

        You ARE correct. Funny to see all the people getting in on the hype. Fact is: The Quest *IS* a significant downstep from the Rift, which is out already for some years.

        • Jeff Schmidt

          If we had better/faster graphics cards that could push VR more I would agree. But current high end cards are barely cutting it (i’m not talking about a titan either). 2080 and 1080 TI are best consumer since the 2080 TI has major problems right now besides the expensive price.

          So I’d rather have a 1 good upgrade instead of 2 barely there upgrades which won’t sell well and make it look like VR is dead.

          • Schorsch

            This is correct, but we don’t need high-end GPUs with foveated rendering. I simply cannot for the life of me see the Quest as an “update”, but then I am a user who really doesn’t care much about the wire or not. (Of course I can see that for others, wireless might be HUGE).

          • Jeff Schmidt

            The wireless is nice. But think of the Quest as a console to the Rift as PC gaming. Console is plug and play and your ready to go (for the most part an idiot can use/do it). It will make it easier for the masses to get into VR which will probably lead to more sales for the Rift/Vive/etc. Because people will want to try something “better”.

            I’m excited for it because of the potential for developers to try more “risky” projects because they made safe game “A” which sold good on the Quest/Rift/Steam. Which gives them money to try something different for the next game. Or just increase the scale of the next game. Increasing VR with actual viable platforms is good for VR.

            Small hardware bumps don’t do much for increasing VR in my eyes. Since only a small amount of people can constantly buy a new VR headset every year or so.

            Yes, I’d love a new CV2 Rift. But there is too many limitations with hardware available now. Wireless limitations and cost are big. Expensive graphics cards are needed since increased resolutions and pov demand a lot more hardware. And those are three things that the Rift 2 would need to be successful for a sequel. That’s why I don’t see Oculus jumping till there is a noticeable upgrade.

            I hope wireless will become cheaper and either will be included in the Rift 2 or as an option for it.

      • WyrdestGeek

        The fun is that I can potentially scrape together $400 and buy one of these, whereas I cannot justify all the money I would have to lay out for a decent graphics card, bare bones system, and Oculus or Vive headset, *then* also have to have a dedicated area to set it up in.

        Of course the result from the tethered system would be much better. But I don’t have the money, the time, or the space.

  • JesuSaveSouls

    I love my life because Jesus saved my soul.

    • George

      You have a soul? And someone saved it? Share your drugs with the world.

      • JesuSaveSouls

        He delivered me from booze,cigarettes and drugs.

        • jj

          …right into utter boredom.

      • JesuSaveSouls

        I hope you have a great holiday and most abundant blessings.I give you the gift of forgiveness for your harsh insults and sarcastic remarks.

    • gothicvillas

      Or… you are possessed

      • JesuSaveSouls

        By God’s Holy Spirit,mercy,grace and love…yes.

        • Nosfar

          I’m a God fearing man ,and I believe the same..But what does that have to do with VR . This is not the place for it man. Maybe use your knowledge of VR to evang.Not your knowledge of Jesus to discuss VR.

          • JesuSaveSouls

            Go into all the nations and make disciples and baptizing them in the name of the Father,Son and Spirit.

      • gothicvillas 5++

    • Davo

      C’mon,. You try to hard. Obvious troll …

      1. Inflammatory Name
      2. Inflammatory Comments

      The guy is obviously sitting back and furiously masturbating over every comment he gets

      • dk

        nah he’s trolling way too much for it to be a joke

      • Jistuce

        Naw, this isn’t a troll. Authentic evangelical, I guarantee.

        • NooYawker

          Either way I reported and blocked him. He’s purposely trying to cause problems.

        • jj

          yupp he/she has a youtube with dumb homemade videos on it

    • NooYawker

      Why do you do this? Are you actually anti-religous and trying to make Christians look bad?

      • JesuSaveSouls

        True religion is caring for orphans and widows.If you would seek God you will find Him but if you deny Him on earth He too will deny you in heaven before His Father.

        • jj

          damnnnn that sounds super troll to me

    • Bryan Ischo

      Well sir, I tried to defend you a few times because I didn’t want to reject someone just because of their religion, but you keep posting non-VR content in a VR forum, and doing it in a way that does by this point seem to be trolling so … welcome to my block list along with all the other losers I have seen. Maybe you can evangelize them. Good luck, and good riddance.

      • JesuSaveSouls

        If you accept Jesus as Lord and Savior you will receive eternal life.

  • Liam Mulligan

    People underestimate the value of a standalone 6dof device in areas such as education. Even the lower poly count is not a deterrent as most training simulation prioritises interaction design over post pro and fx. We have 500,000 students and to date there has been no other scalable offerings like the quest (subject to review) on the horizon. Be interested to see what google and others surprise us with but so far the quest will open alot of doors in many sectors outside of gaming.

    • John McBride

      Hi Liam, I’m curious about your comment “We have 500k students”, what do you do?

      • Liam Mulligan

        Hi John, i work for Australia’s largest vocational education provider in a government funded AR/VR technical specialist role. Ping me on linked in if you want to talk further about it.

    • Schorsch

      No, I do not understate the value for standalone. I absolutely understand and I even see that standalone is likely what will shoot VR’s popularity up. YET, I don’t want this at the cost of “enthusiast VR”, aka tethered. (At this point in time, standalone can simply not even touch tethered in terms of performance and graphical fidelity.)

      But this is sadly HOW IT LOOKS LIKE. Mind you, they scrapped their original Rift 2 design and Iribe even left because of disagreements. Oculus is now fully going out mobile…and I know I will be laughed at, but I would not be surprised if they scrap tethered altogether. It is possible for a variety of reasons.

      And yet, despite having let us down with not updating Rift for such a long time, and now releasing some “compromise Rift S”, people are blindly jumping on the hype for mobile like it’s the best thing since sliced bread.

      Honestly, I can see that Oculus might lose the enthusiast market altogether, that is, when the Valve headset is coming out. And then Oculus has become the “casual VR” company, for low poly casual games and social (speak: facebook). Ask yourself why even Oculus people left…

      • Liam Mulligan

        I think your argument has validity however when you start scaling up which drives the industry forward in line with demand for intuitive solutions there is alot more beneath the surface. Yes tethered devices are critical and they are part of our long term strategic approach, (i have around 14 different hmds in our lab so yes i get it)but they are part of an ecosystem of different solutions. If you want to game then they will be the place to be, if you are training thousands of people then they are hard to feasibly scale. You must consider people have different needs and gaming is just part of the bigger picture.

      • impurekind

        I think providing consumers with the choice of both is the best way to go for now.

      • care package

        Sadly not much of a point to high performance VR with nothing but indies available. I’ve gone back to flat panel gaming myself because that’s where the AAA titles are at.

        • Schorsch

          Well this is not “entirely” correct although I don’t want to deny there is a lot of garbage, especially on Steam. But there *are* good titles, for example I just started playing subnautica which I love.

          BUT: Gaming is only one thing. Personally I gamed so much in my life that at some point I got severe burnout..I often find myself using VR for other things like “experiences” which IMO offers even more potential than “just” gaming. Think education or exploration etc., social and so forth. And simulations, like serious flightsims etc. I would possibly also not even call “games”, in a sense. Sims in VR are just a whole different ball park. Once you sit literally inside a cockpit…how could you ever want to go back to 2D for a flightsim?

          • care package

            Never played flightsims, but I’ve been flying planes and helicopters in Far Cry 5. Graphics are fantastic at 1440p, and I get to blow shit up lol. If I could play that in VR, damn…..
            Alien Isolation is still my best VR experience, and it was never even official.

      • James Luo

        Good thing that at least Oculus still considers enthusiasts as part of the market since they are (confirmed) releasing Oculus Rift S later this year.

    • care package

      Maybe you underestimate the level of cost and development for anything worth a crap, as opposed to, like a virtual tour on rails through a Jurassic jungle. It’s always about time and money, and for all we know, no one cares enough to gather the resources.

      • Liam Mulligan

        Happy trolling.

        • care package

          We need a name for posters that accuse everyone they don’t agree with as trolling. Wait, I think there is one. Snowflake. You really should look up what a troll is btw.

          • Liam Mulligan

            Nice one.

  • Jistuce

    I would be all over this if it worked outdoors. Don’t have enough space inside for cables to be a problem, so all hail the tether!

    • Kevin White

      It might. They didn’t claim that it would, but in the right outdoor space it could be just fine.

      • Jistuce

        I thought they said explicitly that it wouldn’t. Which didn’t surprise me, really. The sun is a lot brighter than most tracking LEDs. Could probably use it outdoors at night, though… hmmm…

  • MW

    No specs and price, no hype.

    • Kevin White

      Most of the specs were released a while back, and I believe $400 (USD) is the expected launch price.

      • MW

        Faith is a virtue, but reality is better.

  • Ted Joseph

    Purchasing 2 on day one! One for sweaty sports games (lost 10lbs already with Thrill of the Fight on the Rift, and it is a life changer for me), and one for relaxing games and videos! I cant wait to play sports games without the chord, and in a larger play area! GO OCULUS/FACEBOOK! You are pioneers of this amazing industry! Thank you for bringing life changing tech into my life!

    • gothicvillas

      But.. this is mobile VR? We have mobile 6dof vr now too

      • Kevin White

        Name it.

  • Adrian Meredith

    If Amd/nvidia can adequently improve their streaming technology to play pc vr on this then I’m sold. AMDs newer streaming is apparently very good, its just lacks decent hardware to stream to

  • impurekind

    :D

  • impurekind

    I want one of these but $400 is so expensive. Can’t wait ’til stuff like this reaches mass market price.

  • domahman

    why can’t we get a wideband multichannel high frequency wireless one directional video communication? The other can communcation can just send location data.

  • domahman

    Great news for the peasants!!! Let them eat cake.

  • The 5Ghz WiFi is for streaming game services. The idea being that you use an outside device to pipe in the high-quality VR. There’s a few services already touting they can do 10ms lag, which is, as I recall, the bare minimum for 90fps HD VR streaming. Since this only runs at 72fps, one of those services should be enough. And, of course, you could stream in your home computer.

  • Mradr

    Honestly – if you are in the group that thinks that stand alone is pointless – the simple answer to you is that this isn’t the product line for you period. There are 3-4 different groups of people out there in the market world. Everyone falls into each group for different product needs. The cheap, inexpensive, the 50%, and 5%. Each group will represent different product lines in almost all brands of any market. For Oculus – and the people like me – we fall into the 5% that wants PC VR at the highest level of hardware and software eye candy we can get. On the other hand you have the 50% that wants the best bang for their buck as they can get for the FPS balance. You could say the CV lines will be for the 5 and 50% range while OQ will be for the 50% and the inexpensive group.